Oldest tennis player ranked world number one (male)
Who
Roger Federer
What
36:314 year(s):day(s)
Where
Not Applicable ()
When

Roger Federer (Switzerland, b. 8 August 1981) was 36 years 314 days old when he returned to the top of the ATP (Association of Tennis Professionals) world rankings for a 310th week on 18 June 2018.


Federer’s return to No.1 was confirmed when he defeated Milos Raonic in the Stuttgart Open final on 17 June 2018. It was his third ATP title of the season after back-to-back wins at the Australian Open (his record-extending 20th Grand Slam title) and the Rotterdam Open.

Federer has spent an unprecedented 310 weeks as the top-ranked male tennis player. After he first claimed the number one spot on 2 February 2004, he put together a run of 237 consecutive weeks (four-and-a-half years) at the top before finally giving way to his great rival Rafael Nadal on 18 August 2008.

The Swiss player’s top-ranked status spans a period of 14 years 136 days (2 February 2004 to 18 June 2018).

Since 2 February 2004, only Federer (310 weeks), Novak Djokovic (275), Rafael Nadal (198, as of 11 November 2019) and Andy Murray (41) have occupied the ATP’s number one ranking.

33 years 125 days – age at which previous male record holder Andre Agassi (b. 29 April 1970) spent the last of his 101 weeks as world number one, on 1 September 2003. Rafael Nadal (b. 3 June 1986) has also now passed Agassi’s mark, at 33 years 161 days old as of 11 November 2019.

35 years 224 days – age at which previous record holder (overall) Serena Williams (b. 26 September 1981) spent the last of her 319 weeks as world number one, on 8 May 2017.

Most weeks as world number one (male), as of 11 November 2019: 310 – Roger Federer; 286 – Pete Sampras; 275 – Novak Djokovic; 270 – Ivan Lendl; 268 – Jimmy Connors; 198 – Rafael Nadal. Most consecutive weeks as world number one (male), as of 11 November 2019: 237 – Roger Federer (2004–07); 160 – Jimmy Connors (1974–77); 157 – Ivan Lendl (1985–88); 122 – Novak Djokovic (2014–16); 102 – Pete Sampras (1996–98).