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World Records Broken at London 2012 Paralympics

Record Title Record Details Record Holder Record Nationality
Most consecutive wheelchair tennis singles matches won (female) Esther Vergeer (Netherlands) had won 470 wheelchair tennis singles matches in a row, as of 7 September 2012. She extended her unbeaten streak at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, where she claimed an unprecedented fourth successive Paralympic title by beating her fellow Dutchwoman Aniek van Koot 6-0, 6-3 in the final at Eton Manor, UK. Vergeer, who has won a total of 26 Grand Slam singles titles since 2002, went through the London 2012 tournament without dropping a set. Esther Vergeer Netherlands
Fastest swim 4 x 100 m medley relay - 34 points (female) Great Britain (Heather Frederiksen, Claire Cashmore, Stephanie Millward, Louise Watkin) dominated the final of the women's 4 x 100 metres medley relay at the IPC (International Paralympic Committee) European Swimming Championships in Berlin, Germany, on 10 July 2011, coming home in 4 min 52.40 sec to set a new world and European record. Team members in this event must not collectively exceed 34 points for their level of physical impairment. Great Britain United Kingdom
Fastest swim 4 x 100 m freestyle relay - 34 points (female) Australia (Ellie Cole, Maddison Elliott, Katherine Downey, Jacqueline Freney) won the women's 4 x 100 metres freestyle relay (34 points) in 4 min 20.39 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. In this event, swimmers who make up a quartet must not exceed 34 points for their level of physical impairment. Australia Australia
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM13 (female) The fastest women's 200 metres individual medley was achieved by Valerie Grand-Maison (Canada), who stopped the clock at 2 min 27.64 sec in the Paralympic final in London, UK, on 7 September 2012. Grand-Maison, who also won two silver medals at London 2012, competes in the SM13 class, for swimmers with a visual impairment. Valerie Grand-Maison Canada
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM12 (female) Russian swimmer Oxana Savchenko won the women's 200 metres individual medley (SM12) in 2 min 28.00 sec at the London 2012 Paralympic Games on 3 September. Savchenko, who won five gold medals at London 2012, including three in as many days starting with her 200 metres individual medley win, competes in a class for swimmers with a visual impairment. Oxana Savchenko Russia
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM11 (female) Mary Fisher (New Zealand) won the final of the women's 200 metres individual medley, for swimmers with a visual impairment, in 2 min 46.91 sec at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, UK, on 8 September. Mary Fisher New Zealand
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM10 (female) Sophie Pascoe (New Zealand) clocked 2 min 25.65 sec in the final of the women's 200 metres individual medley (SM10) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012. Pascoe, 19, who won half of her country's medals in the pool at London 2012, picking up three gold and three silver medals as well as two world records, competes in a classification for swimmers with a physical impairment. Sophie Pascoe New Zealand
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM9 (female) Natalie du Toit became the first female amputee to compete at both the Olympic and Paralympic Games when she represented South Africa at both events in Beijing, China, in 2008. The groundbreaking swimmer, who collected a total of 13 gold medals during her career, won five golds at the 2008 Paralympic Games including the 200 metres individual medley, which she completed in 2 min 27.83 sec on 11 September. Individual medley swimmers with a physical impairment are eligible to compete in the SM9 class. Natalie du Toit South Africa
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM8 (female) Jessica Long (USA) is the world and Paralympic record-holder in the women's 200 metres individual medley (SM8). Her world record swim, 2 min 36.00 sec, was achieved in Bismarck, North Dakota, USA, on 16 June 2012. SM8-class swimmers compete in individual medley events and have a physical impairment. Jessica Long United States
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM7 (female) Jacqueline Freney (Australia) is the world record-holder in the women's 200 metres individual medley, for swimmers with a physical impairment. At the London 2012 Paralympics, at which she equalled Michael Phelps's (USA) Olympic record of eight golds medals at a single Games, she clocked 2 min 54.42 sec at London's Aquatics Centre on 2 September. Jacqueline Freney Australia
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM6 (female) British swimmer Eleanor Simmonds destroyed the field in the final of the women's 200 metres individual medley (SM6) at her home Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012, finishing in a world's best time of 3 min 05.39 sec - almost nine seconds clear of her nearest rival. Eleanor Simmonds United Kingdom
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM5 (female) At the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012, Ukraine's Nataliia Prologaieva won her second gold medal in as many days when she claimed the 200 metres individual medley (SM5) title in 3 min 13.43 sec. Prologaieva, who won three gold and one silver medal from four events at London 2012, competes in a class for individual medley swimmers with a physical impairment. Nataliia Prologaieva Ukraine
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S12 (female) Joanna Mendak (Poland) clocked 1 min 03.11 sec in Berlin, Germany, on 2 June 2006 to set a new record for the women's 100 metres butterfly in the S12 classification, for swimmers with a visual impairment. Joanna Mendak Poland
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S10 (female) The fastest 100 metres butterfly by a woman in the S10 class, for swimmers with a physical impairment, is 1 min 04.43 sec and was achieved by gold medallist Sophie Pascoe (New Zealand) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Sophie Pascoe New Zealand
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S9 (female) Natalie du Toit (South Africa) swam the women's 100 metres butterfly (S9) in 1 min 06.74 sec at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in China on 7 September 2008. In the same year, du Toit, nicknamed "Noodle", became the first female amputee to compete at the Olympic Games when she finished 16th in the women's 10 km open water marathon. Natalie du Toit South Africa
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S8 (female) Jessica Long (USA) swam the women's 100 metres butterfly, for athletes with an physical impairment, in 1 min 10.13 sec in Winnipeg, Canada, on 22 July 2012. One month later, at the London 2012 Paralympic Games on 30 August, Long clocked 1 min 10.32 sec to add the Paralympic record to her list of achievements. Jessica Long United States
Fastest swim 50 m butterfly - S5 (female) Ukraine's Olena Akopyan swam the women's 50 metres butterfly (S5) in 40.51 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 13 September 2008. S5-class swimmers compete in freestyle, backstroke and butterfly events and have a physical impairment. Olena Akopyan Ukraine
Fastest swim 50 m butterfly - S7 (female) Min Huang (China) completed the women's 50 metres butterfly, for swimmers with a physical impairment, in 34.47 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 13 September 2008. Min Huang China
Fastest swim 50 m butterfly - S6 (female) The fastest women's 50 metres butterfly (S6) is 36.05 seconds and was set by Oksana Khrul (Ukraine) to win Paralympic gold at the Games in London, UK, on 7 September 2012. Khrul, 17, competes in the S6 classification, for freestyle, backstroke and butterfly swimmers with a physical impairment. Oksana Khrul Ukraine
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB11 (female) Maja Reichard (Sweden) won the final of the women's 100 metres breaststroke, for swimmers with a visual impairment, in 1 min 27.98 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. Maja Reichard Sweden
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB13 (female) The fastest 100 metres breaststroke (SB13) by a woman has stood since 9 August 2002, when Kirby Cote (Canada) swam 1 min 17.12 sec in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. SB13-class swimmers have a visual impairment. Kirby Cote Canada
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB14 (female) Michelle Alonso Morales (Spain) eased home in the final of the Paralympic 100 metres breaststroke at the Aquatics Centre, London, UK, on 6 September 2012, clocking 1 min 16.85 sec. Alonso Morales, who has an intellectual impairment, finished almost four seconds clear of her nearest challenger. Michelle Alonso Morales Spain
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB12 (female) Natali Pronina (Azerbaijan) swam the final of the women's 100 metres breaststroke in 1 min 16.17 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. Pronina, who finally won a gold medal at the Games on the last night of action at the Aquatics Centre after previously collecting four silver medals, competes in a class for swimmers with a visual impairment. Natali Pronina Azerbaijan
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB9 (female) At the Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia, on 24 October 2000, Jessica Sloan (Canada) swam the women's 100 metres breaststroke, for athletes with a physical impairment, in 1 min 16.93 seconds. Jessica Sloan Canada
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB8 (female) Olesya Vladykina (Russia) had a cushion of more than three seconds when she won the women's 100 metres breaststroke (SB8) in 1 min 17.17 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. SB8 swimmers have a physical impairment. Olesya Vladykina Russia
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB7 (female) The fastest 100 metres breaststroke (SB7) by a woman is 1 min 28.53 sec, set by Russian-born American swimmer Jessica Long in Bismarck, North Dakota, USA, on 14 June 2012. Long, a 12-time Paralympic Games gold medallist who also owns the Paralympic record (1 min 29.28 sec) in this event, is a double lower leg amputee who competes in a class for swimmers with a physical impairment. Jessica Long United States
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB6 (female) Mallory Weggemann (USA) won the women's 100 metres breaststroke (SB6) in 1 min 35.51 sec in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 16 August 2010. Breaststroke swimmers in the SB6 category have a physical impairment. Mallory Weggemann United States
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB5 (female) Germany's Kirsten Bruhn, 42, swam 1 min 33.85 sec for the women's 100 metres breaststroke (SB4) in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 16 August 2010. Kirsten Bruhn Germany
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB4 (female) Nataliia Prologaieva (Ukraine) won the final of the women's 100 metres breaststroke (SB4) in 1 min 43.99 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 4 September 2012. Breaststroke swimmers in the SB4 classification have a physical impairment. Nataliia Prologaieva Ukraine
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S12 (female) Oxana Savchenko (Russia) won gold medals in all five of the events in which she competed at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, and set new world records in four events. In the women's 100 metres backstroke (S12) on 5 September 2012, Savchenko, who has a visual impairment, produced a swim of 1 min 07.99 sec at the Aquatics Centre, London, UK. Oxana Savchenko Russia
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S11 (female) Rina Akiyama (Japan) won the women's 100 metres backstroke in the S11 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment, in 1 min 18.59 sec in front of her home crowd in Osaka, Japan, on 16 July 2012. Akiyama also set a Paralympic record in this event when she raced home in 1 min 19.50 sec in the final at the London 2012 Paralympic Games on 2 September to win the gold medal. Rina Akiyama Japan
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S10 (female) In the final of the women's 100 metres backstroke (S10) at the Aquatics Centre, London, UK, on 4 September 2012, Canada's Summer Ashley Mortimer, 19, set a new world and Paralympic record with a time of 1 min 05.90 sec. Summer Ashley Mortimer Canada
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S9 (female) Stephanie Dixon (Canada) clocked 1 min 09.30 sec in the women's 100 metres backstroke, for swimmers with a physical impairment, at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 13 September 2008. Stephanie Dixon Canada
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S8 (female) The fastest women's 100 metres backstroke (S8) is 1 min 14.36 sec and was set on home soil by Heather Frederiksen (UK) in Sheffield, UK, on 19 March 2009. Frederiksen, who is also the Paralympic record-holder in this event (1 min 16.74 sec), competes in a class for swimmers with a physical impairment. Heather Frederiksen United Kingdom
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S7 (female) The fastest women's 100 metres backstroke (S7) is 1 min 21.57 sec and was set by Kirsten Bruhn (Germany) in Sheffield, UK, on 6 April 2012. S7 swimmers have a physical impairment. Kirsten Bruhn Germany
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S6 (female) Dong Lu (China) swam 1 min 24.71 sec in the final of the women's 100 metres backstroke, for athletes with a physical impairment, at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012. Dong Lu China
Fastest swim 50 m backstroke - S4 (female) Paralympic gold medallist Lisette Teunissen (Netherlands) clocked 48.49 seconds in the women's 50 metres backstroke (S4) in Berlin, Germany, on 29 April 2011. Teunissen, who won the London 2012 final in 51.51 seconds, competes in a classification for swimmers with a physical impairment. Lisette Teunissen Netherlands
Fastest swim 50 m backstroke - S2 (female) Yazhu Feng (China) prevented a Ukrainian clean sweep of the medals in the final of the women's 50 metres backstroke (S2) at the London 2012 Paralympic Games on 5 September, getting the touch in 1 min 03.00 sec to claim the title in a class for swimmers with a physical impairment. Yazhu Feng China
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S12 (female) The fastest completion of the women's 400 metres freestyle (S12), for swimmers with a visual impairment, is 4 min 37.37 sec and was achieved by Russia's Anna Efimenko at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 8 September 2008. Anna Efimenko Russia
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S11 (female) Daniele Schulte (Germany) clocked 5 min 10.77 sec for the women's 400 metres freestyle (S11) in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 19 August 2010. Schulte, who won Paralympic gold in this event at the London 2012 Games, set a new Paralympic record of 5 min 11.32 sec in the heats, which took place at London's Aquatics Centre, on 7 September. The S11 classification is for visually impaired athletes. Daniele Schulte Germany
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S10 (female) The fastest 400 metres freestyle (S10) is 4 min 33.15 sec and was set by Katarzyna Pawlik (Poland) at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 15 September 2008. Swimmers in the S10 classification have a physical impairment. Katarzyna Pawlik Poland
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S9 (female) World, Paralympic and African record-holder in the women's 400 metres freestyle (S9), Natalie du Toit (South Africa), came home in 4 min 23.81 sec at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in China on 12 September 2008. Du Toit, who became the first female amputee to participate in that year's Olympic Games, retired from competitive swimming in 2012 after collecting four medals (three golds and a silver in her final race) at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. Natalie du Toit South Africa
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S8 (female) The fastest S8-class 400 metres freestyle on record is 4 min 42.28 sec and was achieved by Jessica Long (USA) in the Paralympic final at the Aquatics Centre, London, UK, on 31 August 2012. Long, 20, who won five gold, two silver and one bronze medal from nine swimming events at London 2012, competes in a class for freestyle, backstroke and butterfly swimmers who have a physical impairment. Jessica Long United States
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S7 (female) In 2012, Australian swimming sensation Jacqueline Freney matched the achievement of Olympic great Michael Phelps (USA) when she claimed eight gold medals at a single Games. Freney, who has cerebral palsy, cleaned up in the 50 metres freestyle (S7), 50 metres butterfly (S7), 100 metres freestyle (S7), 100 metres backstroke (S7), 200 metres individual medley (SM7), 4 x 100 metres freestyle relay (34 points) and 4 x 100 metres medley relay (34 points) as well as the 400 metres freestyle (S6), when she clocked 4 min 59.02 sec at the Aquatics Centre, London, UK, on 6 September 2012. Jacqueline Freney Australia
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S6 (female) Eleanor "Ellie" Simmonds (UK) smashed the women's 400 metres freestyle world record with a swim of 5 min 19.17 sec at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, UK, on 1 September. Simmonds, who also won gold in the 200 metres individual medley - again in a record time - at London 2012, competes in a class for swimmers with a physical impairment. Eleanor Simmonds United Kingdom
Fastest swim 200 m freestyle - S5 (female) Beatrice Hess (France) swam the women's 200 metres freestyle (S5) in 2 min 44.61 sec at the Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games on 23 October. S5 swimmers have a physical impairment. Beatrice Hess France
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S13 (female) Canada's Valerie Grand-Maison is the women's 100 metres freestyle record-holder in the S13 category, for visually impaired swimmers. At the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 10 September 2008, Grand-Maison came home in 58.87 seconds. Valerie Grand-Maison Canada
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S12 (female) Oxana Savchenko (Russia), a five-time Paralympic Games gold medallist at London 2012, won the final of the women's 100 metres freestyle in 58.41 seconds at the Aquatics Centre on 4 September. Swimmers in the S12 classification have a visual impairment. Oxana Savchenko Russia
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S11 (female) The fastest 100 metres freestyle in the S11 class, for swimmers with a visual impairment, is 1 min 07.29 sec and was achieved by Cecilia Camellini (Italy) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. Cecilia Camellini Italy
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S10 (female) The fastest women's 100 metres freestyle (S10) is 1 min 00.37 sec and was set by New Zealand's Sophie Pascoe in Sheffield, UK, on 7 April 2012. Pascoe, who collected three gold and three silver medals at the London 2012 Paralympic Games (half of the 12 swimming medals won by New Zealand at the event), where she set a new Paralympic record of 1 min 00.89 sec on 6 September, competes in the S10 class, for swimmers with a physical impairment. Sophie Pascoe New Zealand
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S9 (female) Natalie du Toit (South Africa) set new world and Paralympic records in the women's 100 metres freestyle (S9) four months apart in 2008. On 6 May in Manchester, UK, she swam 1 min 01.08 sec, and at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 8 September, she stormed home in 1 min 01.44 sec. Natalie du Toit South Africa
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S8 (female) Jessica Long (USA) won five gold, two silver and one bronze medal at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, with the 100 metres freestyle (S8) one of her gold medal successes. In the final at the city's Aquatics Centre on 6 September, she clocked 1 min 05.63 sec. Jessica Long United States
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S7 (female) In front of her home crowd in Adelaide, Australia, on 19 March 2012, Jacqueline Freney set a new benchmark in the S7 class of the women's 100 metres freestyle, clocking 1 min 08.03 sec. Freney, who swims in a class for athletes with a physical impairment, is also the Paralympic record-holder in this event. On 3 September 2012, she swam 1 min 09.39 sec to land one of the eight gold medals she won at the Games in London, UK. Jacqueline Freney Australia
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S6 (female) Victoria Arlen (USA) won the final of the women's 100 metres freestyle (S6) in 1 min 13.33 sec at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, UK, on 8 September. The 17-year-old, who also won three silver medals at the London Games, competes in a classification for swimmers with a physical impairment. Victoria Arlen United States
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S5 (female) Teresa Perales (Spain) clocked 1 min 16.65 sec in the Paralympic final of the women's 100 metres freestyle on 7 September 2008. Her swim, in Beijing, China, helped her retain the Paralympic 100 metres freestyle title she won in Athens, Greece, in 2004, and the wheelchair-bound swimmer made it a hat-trick of wins in the event when she came home ahead of the field at London 2012. Teresa Perales Spain
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S3 (female) Jiangbo Xia (China) won a Paralympic gold medal in the women's 100 metres freestyle - for swimmers with a physical impairment - at the Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. She finished in 1 min 44.32 seconds. Jiangbo Xia China
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S13 (female) Yvonne Hopf's (Germany) 50 metres freestyle (S13) world record of 27.38 seconds has stood since 25 August 1996, when the visually impaired swimmer set the mark at the Paralympic Games in Atlanta, USA. Yvonne Hopf Germany
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S12 (female) Oxana Savchenko (Russia) is the world record-holder for the women's 50 metres freestyle (S12). The visually impaired swimmer, who won a total of five gold medals (from five events) at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, clocked 26.90 seconds at London's Aquatics Centre, UK, on 7 September 2012. Oxana Savchenko Russia
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S11 (female) Italy's visually impaired swimmer Cecilia Camellini took gold in the women's 50 metres freestyle at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, stopping the clock at 30.94 seconds on 1 September. Cecilia Camellini Italy
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S10 (female) Summer Ashley Mortimer (Canada) won the Paralympic final of the women's 50 metres freestyle (S10) in 28.10 seconds in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. Athletes with a physical impairment are eligible for the S10 classification. Summer Ashley Mortimer Canada
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S9 (female) Legendary South African swimmer Natalie du Toit, who in 2008 became the first female amputee to compete at the Olympic Games, stopped the clock at 29.04 seconds when she swam the 50 metres freestyle in Manchester, UK, on 6 May 2006. Natalie du Toit South Africa
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S8 (female) On home soil in Guangzhou, China, on 17 December 2010, Shengnan Jiang clocked 30.85 seconds for the women's 50 metres freestyle, for swimmers with a physical impairment. Shengnan Jiang China
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S7 (female) Mallory Weggemann (USA) won the women's 50 metres freestyle, for swimmers with a physical impairment, in 31.64 seconds in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 17 August 2010. Mallory Weggemann United States
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S6 (female) Mirjam de Koning-Peper (Netherlands) swam the women's 50 metres freestyle (S6) in 34.77 seconds in Berlin, Germany, on 28 June 2012. The 43-year-old Dutchwoman, who competes in a class for swimmers with a physical impairment, matched this time in the 50 metres freestyle final at the London 2012 Paralympic Games on 4 September. Mirjam de Koning-Peper Netherlands
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S5 (female) Teresa Perales (Spain) won the women's 50 metres freestyle (S5) in 35.88 seconds at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games on 15 September. S5 swimmers have a physical impairment. Teresa Perales Spain
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S3 (female) Jiangbo Xia (China) clocked 48.11 seconds in the final of the women's 50 metres freestyle (S3) at the London 2012 Paralympic Games on 7 September. Xia, who also smashed the women's 100 metres freestyle (S3) record at London 2012, competes in a class for athletes with a physical impairment. Jiangbo Xia China
Fastest swim 4 x 100 m medley relay - 34 points (male) In the final of the men's 4 x 100 metres medley relay at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, China (Xiaobing Liu, Furong Lin, Yanpeng Wei, Yinan Wang) finished in a time of 4 min 09.04 sec on 8 September 2012 to win the gold medal. The quartet, made up of two S9 and two S8 swimmers (total 34 points - 9 + 9 + 8 + 8), compete in an event for athletes with a physical impairment. China China
Fastest swim 4 x 100 m freestyle relay - 34 points (male) Australia (Matthew Levy, Peter Leek, Matthew Cowdrey, Andrew Pasterfield) swam the men's 4 x 100 metres freestyle relay in 3 min 48.72 sec in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 15 August 2010. The quartets who make up each team in this event must not exceed 34 points for their individual classifications. Levy (S7), Leek (S8), Cowdrey (S9) and Pasterfield (S10) totalled 34 points (7 + 8 + 9 + 10) and were therefore eligible to compete. The event is for swimmers with a physical impairment. Australia Australia
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM11 (male) Visually impaired Chinese swimmer Bozun Yang won three gold, two silver and one bronze medal at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. On 8 September, Yang clocked 2 min 22.40 sec in the final of the men's 200 metres individual medley (SM11) to secure his third gold of the Games. Bozun Yang China
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM12 (male) Maksym Veraksa (Ukraine) clocked 2 min 11.11 sec for the men's 200 metres individual medley, for swimmers with a visual impairment, in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 15 August 2010. Veraksa won three gold medals at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, where he set a new Paralympic record in this event on 3 September - 2 min 12.42 sec. Maksym Veraksa Ukraine
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM13 (male) Visually impaired Belarusian swimmer Ihar Boki, 18, was one of the most successful male athletes in the pool at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK, collecting five gold and one silver medal. One of his gold medal-winning performances came in the men's 200 metres individual medley on 7 September, when he smashed the world record by posting a time of 2 min 06.30 sec. Ihar Boki Belarus
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM10 (male) In the final of the Paralympic SM10-class 200 metres individual medley at the Aquatics Centre, London, UK, on 30 August 2012, Canada's Benoit Huot clocked 2 min 10.01 sec. Swimmers competing in individual medley events ('SM') who have a physical impairment are eligible for the SM10 classification. Benoit Huot Canada
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM9 (male) Matthew Cowdrey (Australia) is a 13-time Paralympic Games gold medallist who won five titles in each of the last two Games, in Beijing, China, in 2008 and in London, UK, in 2012. On 11 September 2008, in the men's 200 metres individual medley, he came home in a world's best 2 min 13.60 sec. Matthew Cowdrey Australia
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM8 (male) At the 2008 Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 11 September, Australia's Peter Leek swam the final of the men's 200 metres individual medley, for athletes with a physical impairment, in 2 min 20.92 sec. Peter Leek Australia
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM7 (male) Yevheniy Bohodayko (Ukraine) set new world, Paralympic and European records for the men's SM7- class 200 metres individual medley when he raced home in 2 min 33.13 sec at the Aquatics Centre, London, UK, on 2 September 2012. Swimmers competing in the SM7 class have a physical impairment. Yevheniy Bohodayko Ukraine
Fastest swim 200 m individual medley - SM6 (male) Qing Xu (China) clocked 2 min 38.62 sec for the men's 200 metres individual medley to win gold at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. Xu competes in a classification for individual medley swimmers with a physical impairment. Qing Xu China
Fastest swim 150 m individual medley - SM3 (male) Jianping Du (China) swam the final of the men's 150 metres individual medley (SM3 class) in 2 min 43.72 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012. SM3 swimmers have a physical impairment. Jianping Du China
Fastest swim 150 m individual medley - SM4 (male) Cameron Leslie (Australia) clocked 2 min 25.98 sec in the final of the men's 150 metres individual medley at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012. The SM4 classification is for swimmers with a physical impairment who compete in individual medley events. Cameron Leslie Australia
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S13 (male) Australian 100 metres butterfly specialist Timothy Antalfy recorded the fastest ever swim for an athlete competing in the S13 classification (for swimmers with a visual impairment) when he clocked 54.92 seconds in front of his home crowd in Adelaide, Australia, on 21 March 2012. Timothy Antalfy Australia
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S12 (male) The fastest men's 100 metres butterfly (S12) is 56.90 seconds and was set by Raman Makarau (Belarus) at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. The S12 classification is for swimmers who are visually impaired. Raman Makarau Belarus
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S11 (male) Enhamed Enhamed (Spain) is an S11-class swimmer who clocked 1 min 01.12 sec in the Paralympic Games final of the men's 100 metres butterfly in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. The S11 class is for swimmers with a visual impairment. Enhamed Enhamed Spain
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S10 (male) Andre Brasil swam the men's 100 metres butterfly (S10) in 55.99 seconds in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 15 August 2010. The Brazilian swimmer competes in the S10 classification, which is for athletes with a physical impairment. Andre Brasil Brazil
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S9 (male) On 9 July 2011, Tamas Sors (Hungary) swam the fastest 100 metres butterfly (S9) in history, finishing in a time of 59.23 seconds in Berlin, Germany. Sors, who is also the Paralympic record-holder in this event, competes in a class for swimmers with a physical impairment. Tamas Sors Hungary
Fastest swim 100 m butterfly - S8 (male) The fastest men's 100 metres butterfly in the S8 classification (for swimmers with a physical impairment) is 1 min 00.45 sec and was set by Australia's Peter Leek in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 19 August 2010. Peter Leek Australia
Fastest swim 50 m butterfly - S7 (male) Paralympic gold medallist Shiyun Pan (China) came home in 29.49 seconds in the final of the men's 50 metres butterfly (S7) at the Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. The race was contested by swimmers with a physical impairment. Shiyun Pan China
Fastest swim 50 m butterfly - S6 (male) Chinese swimmers finished in three of the first four places in the Paralympic final of the men's 50 metres butterfly (S6) at the 2012 Games in London, UK, with Qing Xu leading home the field in a time of 29.90 seconds on 7 September. S6 swimmers have a physical impairment. Qing Xu China
Fastest swim 50 m butterfly - S5 (male) Daniel Dias (Brazil) swam the 50 metres butterfly (S5) in 34.15 seconds at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 7 September. Dias, who won more gold medals (six) at the London Paralympics than any other male swimmer, competes in a classification for athletes with a physical impairment. Daniel Dias Brazil
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB14 (male) The fastest men's 100 metres breaststroke (SB14) was achieved by Japan's Yasuhiro Tanaka to win Paralympic gold at the Aquatics Centre in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. In the final, for swimmers with an intellectual impairment, Tanaka was first to the touch in 1 min 06.69 sec. Yasuhiro Tanaka Japan
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB13 (male) The fastest 100 metres breaststroke in the SB13 class (for swimmers with a visual impairment) is 1 min 03.91 sec and was set by Oleksii Fedyna (Ukraine) in Berlin, Germany, on 4 July 2011. Oleksii Fedyna Ukraine
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB12 (male) Mikhail Zimin (Russia) swam the men's 100 metres breaststroke (SB12) final in 1 min 07.05 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. Zimin is a visually impaired swimmer who competes in a class (denoted by the 'SB' prefix) solely for breaststroke events. Mikhail Zimin Russia
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB11 (male) China's Bozun Yang won medals in each of the six events in which he swam at the London 2012 Paralympic Games in the UK. In the final of the men's 100 metres breaststroke (SB11) on 3 September 2012, the visually impaired swimmer came home in 1 min 10.11 sec to re-write the record books. Bozun Yang China
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB9 (male) The fastest men's 100 metres breaststroke in the SB9 class (for swimmers with a physical impairment) was set at the London 2012 Paralympic Games, UK, on 8 September. It was achieved by Russia's Pavel Poltavtsev, who clocked 1 min 04.02 sec in the final on the last day of action in the pool at London's Aquatics Centre. Pavel Poltavtsev Russia
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB8 (male) The fastest men's 100 metres breaststroke (SB8) was achieved by Andriy Kalyna (Ukraine) at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in China. Kalyna's gold medal-winning performance was timed at 1 min 07.01 sec in the final on 9 September. Andriy Kalyna Ukraine
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB7 (male) The fastest men's 100 metres breaststroke in the SB7 classification was set by Blake Cochrane (Australia). He clocked 1 min 18.77 sec to win Paralympic gold in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. SB7 breaststroke swimmers have a physical impairment. Blake Cochrane Australia
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB6 (male) Ukraine's Yevheniy Bohodayko swam 1 min 20.17 sec in the final of the men's 100 metres breaststroke (SB6) at the London 2012 Paralympic Games on 5 September 2012. The SB6 classification is for breaststroke swimmers with a physical impairment. Yevheniy Bohodayko Ukraine
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB5 (male) One of the longest-standing world records in swimming events for athletes with a physical impairment was set by Kasper Engel (Netherlands), who finished the men's 100 metres breaststroke (SB5) in 1 min 31.50 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Atlanta, USA, on 24 August 1996. Breaststroke swimmers alone compete in the 'SB' classification. Kasper Engel Netherlands
Fastest swim 100 m breaststroke - SB4 (male) Daniel Dias (Brazil), a six-time gold medallist at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK, swam the men's 100 metres breaststroke in 1 min 32.27 sec at London's Aquatics Centre on 4 September 2012. Daniel Dias Brazil
Fastest swim 50 m breaststroke - SB2 (male) Arnulfo Castorena's (Mexico) world record in the men's 50 metres breaststroke (SB2) - 56.27 seconds - has stood since he won the event at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece, on 23 September 2004. Swimmers in the SB2 classification have a physical impairment. Arnulfo Castorena Mexico
Fastest swim 50 m breaststroke - SB3 (male) Takayuki Suzuki (Japan) swam 48.49 seconds for the men's 50 metres breaststroke (SB3) at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 11 September 2008. The 'SB' prefix is solely for breaststroke competitors, with the number '3' indicating an event for swimmers with a physical impairment. Takayuki Suzuki Japan
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S14 (male) Marc Evers (Netherlands) swam the final of the men's 100 metres backstroke (S14) in 1 min 01.85 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. S14 swimmers have an intellectual impairment and are eligible to compete in freestyle, backstroke and butterfly events. Marc Evers Netherlands
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S13 (male) Ihar Boki (Belarus), who picked up five golds and one silver medal at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK, set a new world record in the men's 100 metres backstroke (S13) at the Aquatics Centre on 3 September with a time of 56.97 seconds. Ihar Boki Belarus
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S12 (male) Aleksandr Nevolin-Svetov (Russia) won the final of the men's 100 metres backstroke (S12) in 59.35 seconds at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012. Aleksandr Nevolin-Svetov Russia
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S11 (male) Bozun Yang (China) swam 1 min 07.74 sec for the men's 100 metres backstroke in the S11 class (for visually impaired athletes) at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 13 September 2008. Bozun Yang China
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S10 (male) Justin Zook (USA) narrowly failed to break the minute barrier for the men's 100 metres backstroke (S10) but still won a gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 4 September 2012 when he finished the race in 1 min 00.01 sec. S10 swimmers have a physical impairment. Justin Zook United States
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S9 (male) Australian swimmer Matthew Cowdrey clocked 1 min 01.85 sec in the men's 100 metres backstroke (S9 class) in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 20 August 2010. Matthew Cowdrey Australia
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S8 (male) Konstantin Lisenkov (Russia) swam 1 min 04.67 sec for the men's 100 metres backstroke (S8) in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 15 August 2010. S8 swimmers have a physical impairment. Konstantin Lisenkov Russia
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S7 (male) In the heats of the men's 100 metres backstroke (S7) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012, Jonathan Fox (UK) came home in 1 min 09.86 sec. Fox, who won the final later that same day, competes in the S7 classification, for swimmers with a physical impairment. Jonathan Fox United Kingdom
Fastest swim 100 m backstroke - S6 (male) Tao Zheng (China) won a Paralympic gold medal in the men's 100 metres backstroke (S6) at the Aquatics Centre in London, UK, on 30 August 2012, clocking 1 min 13.56 sec. Swimmers in the S6 class have a physical impairment. Tao Zheng China
Fastest swim 50 m backstroke - S5 (male) Daniel Dias (Brazil) won six gold medals in the eight events in which he competed at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK. He set a new world record (his third of the Games) in the men's 50 metres backstroke (S5) with a swim of 34.99 seconds at the Aquatics Centre on 6 September 2012. Daniel Dias Brazil
Fastest swim 50 m backstroke - S4 (male) Juan Reyes (Mexico) swam the men's 50 metres backstroke (S4) in 42.71 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 8 September 2008. Reyes, who retained his title at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK, competes in a classification for athletes with a physical impairment. Juan Reyes Mexico
Fastest swim 50 m backstroke - S3 (male) Byeong-Eon Min (South Korea) swam the men's 50 metres backstroke (S3) in 42.21 seconds to claim Paralympic gold at the Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012. Byeong-Eon Min Korea (South)
Fastest swim 50 m backstroke - S2 (male) Curtis Lovejoy (USA) swam the men's 50 metres backstroke (S2) in 1 min 00.11 sec at the Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia, on 27 October 2000. S2 swimmers have a physical impairment. Curtis Lovejoy United States
Fastest swim 50 m backstroke - S1 (male) Hennadii Boiko (Ukraine) swam the men's 50 metres backstroke (S1) in 1 min 04.29 sec to win a gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. Swimmers in the S1 class have a physical impairment and compete in the freestyle, backstroke and butterfly events. Hennadii Boiko Ukraine
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S13 (male) Ihar Boki (Belarus) won five gold medals and set four new world records in the S13 class at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK. His fourth win, and third world record, came in the men's 400 metres freestyle at the Aquatics Centre on 4 September, when he finished in 3 min 58.78 sec. Ihar Boki Belarus
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S12 (male) Sergey Punko (Russia) swam the men's 400 metres freestyle (S12) final in 4 min 08.64 sec at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 11 September 2008. Punko, who retained his Paralympic title in London, UK, in 2012, competes in a class for visually impaired swimmers. Sergey Punko Russia
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S11 (male) Visually impaired S11-class swimmer John Morgan (USA) swam the men's 400 metres freestyle in 4 min 20.83 sec at the Paralympic Games in Barcelona, Spain, on 7 September 1992. John Morgan United States
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S10 (male) On 7 August 2001, in front of his home crowd in Toronto, Canadian swimmer Philippe Gagnon posted the fastest ever time in the men's 400 metres freestyle - 4 min 04.20 sec. The S10 classification features swimmers who have a physical impairment. Philippe Gagnon Canada
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S9 (male) Brenden Hall (Australia) won the final of the men's 400 metres freestyle (S9) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 4 September 2012 in a time of 4 min 10.88 sec. Hall competes in a classification for freestyle, backstroke and butterfly swimmers who have a physical impairment. Brenden Hall Australia
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S8 (male) Sam Hynd (UK) holds the world record in the men's 400 metres freestyle, coming home in 4 min 26.08 sec in Manchester, UK, on 31 May 2010. Hynd competes in a class for swimmers with a physical impairment. Sam Hynd United Kingdom
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S7 (male) Josef Craig (UK) won a Paralympic Games gold medal in the final of the men's 400 metres freestyle (S7) with a swim of 4 min 42.81 sec at the Aquatics Centre in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. Josef Craig United Kingdom
Fastest swim 400 m freestyle - S6 (male) Sweden's Anders Olsson swam 4 min 47.75 sec for the men's 400 metres (S6) in Reykjavik, Iceland, on 18 October 2009. Athletes in the S6 class have a physical impairment. Anders Olsson Sweden
Fastest swim 200 m freestyle - S14 (male) Jon Margeir Sverrisson (Iceland) clocked 1 min 59.62 sec in the men's 200 metres freestyle final at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012. Swimmers who compete in the S14 classification have an intellectual impairment. Jon Margeir Sverrisson Iceland
Fastest swim 200 m freestyle - S5 (male) Multiple S5 record-holder Daniel Dias (Brazil) swam 2 min 26.51 sec for the men's 200 metres freestyle in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 19 August 2010. Daniel Dias Brazil
Fastest swim 200 m freestyle - S4 (male) Richard Oribe (Spain) swam the men's 200 metres freestyle (S4) in 2 min 55.81 sec at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. S4 swimmers have a physical impairment and are eligible for the freestyle, backstroke and butterfly events. Richard Oribe Spain
Fastest swim 200 m freestyle - S2 (male) Dmitrii Kokarev (Russia) clocked 4 min 34.39 sec for the men's 200 metres freestyle (S2) in Tyumen, Russia, on 27 April 2012. Swimmers in the S2 class have a physical impairment. Dmitrii Kokarev Russia
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S13 (male) Ihar Boki (Belarus) put in a gold medal-winning performance at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012, swimming the men's 100 metres freestyle (S13), for visually impaired competitors, in 51.91 seconds. Ihar Boki Belarus
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S12 (male) The fastest 100 metres freestyle by a man in the S12 class is 50.91 seconds and was set by Ukraine's Maksym Veraksa in Reykjavik, Iceland, on 24 October 2009. S12-class swimmers have a visual impairment. Maksym Veraksa Ukraine
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S11 (male) John Morgan's (USA) 100 metres freestyle world record in the S11 class, 56.67 seconds, has remained intact since 9 August 1986. Morgan's long-standing mark was set in Gothenburg, Sweden. John Morgan United States
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S10 (male) Brazil's appropriately named Andre Brasil swam 50.87 seconds for the men's 100 metres freestyle (S10 classification) in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, on 17 August 2010. S10 athletes have a physical impairment. Andre Brasil Brazil
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S9 (male) Matthew Cowdrey (Australia) swam the men's 100 metres freestyle (S9) in 55.30 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 8 September 2008. Cowdrey, who retained his Paralympic title at London 2012, competes in a class that features swimmers with a physical impairment. Matthew Cowdrey Australia
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S8 (male) China's Yinan Wang clocked 56.58 seconds in the final of the men's 100 metres freestyle (S8) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. Swimmers in the S8 classification have a physical impairment and compete in freestyle, backstroke and butterfly events. Yinan Wang China
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S7 (male) In 2008, British swimmer David Roberts set new world and Paralympic marks in the men's 100 metres freestyle (S7), clocking 1 min 00.34 sec in Sheffield, UK, on 2 April 2008 and 1 min 00.35 sec at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 8 September 2008. S7 swimmers have a physical impairment. David Roberts United Kingdom
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S6 (male) Anders Olsson (Sweden) swam 1 min 05.45 sec for the men's 100 metres freestyle (S6) in Reykjavik, Iceland, on 22 October 2009. The S6 classification is for athletes with a physical impairment. Anders Olsson Sweden
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S5 (male) The fastest men's 100 metres freestyle in the S5 classification, for swimmers with a physical impairment, was achieved by Daniel Dias (Brazil) in Berlin, Germany, on 1 May 2011 when he finished in a time of 1 min 09.44 sec. Daniel Dias Brazil
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S4 (male) Spanish S4-class 100 metres freestyle swimmer Richard Oribe clocked 1 min 22.43 sec in Berlin, Germany, on 30 May 2009. S4 swimmers have a physical impairment. Richard Oribe Spain
Fastest swim 100 m freestyle - S2 (male) Yang Yang (China) set a new world record in the final of the men's 100 metres freestyle (S2 class) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012, clocking 2 min 03.71 sec. S2 swimmers have a physical impairment and compete in freestyle, backstroke and butterfly events. Yang Yang China
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S13 (male) Oleksii Fedyna (Ukraine) swam 23.75 seconds in the men's 50 metres freestyle at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 15 September 2008. The S13 classification is for swimmers with a visual impairment. Oleksii Fedyna Ukraine
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S12 (male) Visually impaired swimmer Maksym Veraksa (Ukraine) is the world and Paralympic record-holder in the men's 50 metres freestyle (S12 class), clocking a world's best 22.99 seconds in Reykjavik, Iceland, on 21 October 2009 and 23.43 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 14 September 2008. Maksym Veraksa Ukraine
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S11 (male) Bozun Yang (China) swam the men's 50 metres freestyle final in 25.27 seconds at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Swimmers in the S11-S13 classifications have a visual impairment, with class 11 featuring athletes with little or no sight. Bozun Yang China
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S10 (male) Brazilian 50 metres freestyle swimmer Andre Brasil set a new world and Paralympic S10 record at the Aquatics Centre in London, UK, on 31 August 2012, coming home in 23.16 seconds. Brasil competes in a classification for swimmers with a physical impairment. Andre Brasil Brazil
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S9 (male) Matthew Cowdrey (Australia) swam 25.13 seconds for the men's 50 metres freestyle to win gold at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012. Swimmers in the S9 category have a physical impairment. Matthew Cowdrey Australia
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S8 (male) Russia's Denis Tarasov claimed a gold medal with a swim of 25.82 seconds in the final of the men's 50 metres freestyle (S8) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. S8 swimmers have a physical impairment and compete in freestyle, backstroke and butterfly events. Denis Tarasov Russia
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S7 (male) David Roberts (UK) swam the men's 50 m freestyle (S7 classification) in 27.67 seconds in front of his home crowd in Sheffield, UK, on 4 April 2008. Roberts won 11 Paralympic swimming gold medals in three Games (2000, 2004, 2008) - a British record gold haul matched only by wheelchair racer Baroness (Tanni) Grey-Thompson and swimmer/cyclist Sarah Storey. David Roberts United Kingdom
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S6 (male) The Paralympic final of the men's S6 classification 50 metres freestyle was won by China's Qing Xu in 28.57 seconds at the Aquatics Centre in London, UK, on 4 September 2012. Swimmers in the S6 classification have a physical impairment. Qing Xu China
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S5 (male) Daniel Dias (Brazil) won the men's 50 metres freestyle final (S5 classification) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012 in 32.05 seconds. S5 swimmers have a physical impairment. Daniel Dias Brazil
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S4 (male) Yuji Hanada (Japan) swam the men's 50 metres freestyle (S4 classification) in 37.54 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece, on 27 September 2004. The S4 class is for freestyle, backstroke or butterfly swimmers with a physical impairment. Yuji Hanada Japan
Fastest swim 50 m freestyle - S2 (male) Curtis Lovejoy (USA) swam the men's 50 m freestyle (S2 classification) in 1 min 00.11 sec at the Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia, on 27 October 2000. The S2 class is for freestyle, backstroke or butterfly swimmers with a physical impairment. Curtis Lovejoy United States
ISSF shooting, mixed 50 m pistol (SH1) Seakyun Park (South Korea) made history at the 2008 Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, setting new world (552 points) and final world (644.9 points) records in the SH1-classification mixed 50 metres pistol competition on 12 September. The SH1 class features athletes who can support the weight of their firearm themselves and shoot using a rifle or pistol. Seakyun Park Korea (South)
ISSF shooting, mixed 25 m pistol (SH1) Russian shooter Andrey Lebedinskiy has twice scored 587 points in mixed 25 metres pistol competition in the SH1 classification, first at the Paralympic Games in Atlanta, USA, on 24 August 1996 and again in Chatenoy, France, on 1 January 1997. Lebedinskiy also set a new Paralympic final world record - 774.7 points - in Beijing, China, on 10 September 2008, but this mark was short of the overall final world record of 777.4 points, achieved by Valery Ponomarenko (Russia) in Fort Benning, USA, on 5 October 2011. The SH1 classification is for athletes who can support the weight of their firearm themselves. Andrey Lebedinskiy, Valery Ponomarenko Russia
ISSF shooting, mixed 50 m rifle prone (SH1) Veteran Swedish hotshot Jonas Jakobsson fired his way into the record books at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece, on 23 September 2004, setting new world (597 points) and final world (701.4 points) records in the mixed 50 metres rifle (prone position). SH1-class shooters can support the weight of their firearm themselves and shoot using a rifle or pistol. Jonas Jakobsson Sweden
ISSF shooting, mixed 10 m air rifle prone (SH2) The most points scored in the SH2 class in mixed 10 metres air rifle (prone position) competition is 600 and was achieved by Lone Overbye (Denmark) in Bruges, Belgium, on 1 August 1993 and Bradley Mark (Australia) in the qualifying round at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. The final world record is held by Gorazd Francek Tirsek (Slovenia), who scored 706.8 points in Antalya, Turkey, on 4 May 2012. SH2 shooters use a stand for support as they have an impairment that affects one or both of their arms. Lone Overbye, Bradley Mark Denmark
ISSF shooting, mixed 10 m air rifle standing (SH2) Michael Johnson (New Zealand), at the Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia, on 26 October 2000, and Juyoung Kang (South Korea), in qualification for the London Paralympic Games final on 2 September 2012, share the 600-point world record for the mixed 10 metres air rifle (standing position) in the SH2 classification, which is for athletes who use a shooting stand for support as they have an impairment that affects one or both of their arms. Michael Johnson, Juyoung Kang New Zealand
ISSF shooting, mixed 10 m air rifle prone (SH1) Jonas Jakobsson (Sweden) and Natascha Hiltrop (Germany) both amassed 600 points in the mixed (male and female) SH1 classification 10 metres air rifle (prone position), Jakobsson in Jarvenpaa, Finland, on 1 August 1995 and Hiltrop in the qualifying round at the London 2012 Paralympic Games on 1 September. The final world and Paralympic record stands at 706.7 points and was set by London 2012 gold medallist Cedric Fevre (France) on 1 September. Jonas Jakobsson, Natascha Hiltrop, Cedric Fevre Sweden
ISSF shooting, women's 10 m air pistol (SH1) Olivera Nakovska-Bikova (Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia) scored 381 points in qualification for the final of the women's 10 metres air pistol competition at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. Marina Klimenchenko (Russia) scored 477.9 points in Zagreb, Croatia, on 22 July 2010 to set a new mark for the most points scored in a women's 10 metres air pistol final. Olivera Nakovska-Bikova, Marina Klimenchenko Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of
ISSF shooting, women's 50 m rifle 3 positions (SH1) Yunri Lee (South Korea, SH1 classification) holds the women's 50 metres rifle 3 positions world and finals world records with 579 points and 676.9 points, respectively. She set both marks at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. The SH1 classification features athletes who can support the weight of their firearm themselves and shoot using a rifle or pistol. Yunri Lee Korea (South)
ISSF shooting, women's 10 m air rifle standing (SH1) The most points scored in the SH1 class of the women's 10 metres air rifle (standing position) is 399 and was set by South Korean shooter Im-Yeon Kim in Seoul, South Korea, on 6 July 2002. The most points scored in a women's 10 m air rifle final is 500.9 and was accomplished by gold medallist Cuiping Zhang (China) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012. The SH1 classification features athletes who can support the weight of their firearm themselves and shoot using a rifle or pistol. Im-Yeon Kim Korea (South)
ISSF shooting, men's 10 m air pistol (SH1) Valery Ponomarenko (Russia) amassed 578 points in the men's SH1 classification 10 metres air pistol event at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 7 September 2008. Ponomarenko is also the record-holder for 10 metres air pistol finals, amassing 672.4 points in the same competition in Beijing. Shooters competing in the SH1 classification can support the weight of their firearm themselves and shoot using a rifle or pistol. Valery Ponomarenko Russia
ISSF shooting, men's 50 m rifle 3 positions (SH1) Jonas Jakobsson (Sweden) scored 1,163 points in the men's SH1 class 50 metres rifle 3 positions competition at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 10 September 2008. The veteran shooter also holds the final world record, scoring 1,264.3 points to win a gold medal in the same competition. Shooters competing in the SH1 classification can support the weight of their firearm themselves. Jonas Jakobsson Sweden
ISSF shooting, men's 10 m air rifle standing (SH1) Two men share the record for the SH1 classification 10 metres air rifle (standing position) with 596 points. Jonas Jakobsson (Sweden) set the mark at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 8 September 2008, and it was matched by Chao Dong (China) in the qualifying round at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. Jakobsson is also the final world record-holder, scoring 700.5 points at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 8 September 2008. Shooters competing in the SH1 classification can support the weight of their firearm themselves. Jonas Jakobsson, Chao Dong Sweden
Heaviest powerlift (+82.5 kg, female) Grace Anozie, who was one of six Nigerian powerlifters (five of them women) to win gold at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK, is the women's +82.5 kg record-holder. In Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on 25 February 2012, she lifted 168 kg to add the world +82.5 kg record to her Paralympic record, 165 kg, which she set in Beijing, China, on 14 September 2008. Grace Anozie Nigeria
Heaviest powerlift (-82.5 kg, female) At the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 14 September 2008, powerlifter Heba Ahmed (Egypt) completed a lift of 155 kg in the women's -82.5 kg division. Heba Ahmed Egypt
Heaviest powerlift (-75 kg, female) Nigeria's Folashade Oluwafemiayo had to settle for a silver medal in the women's -75 kg class at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012, but earlier that same day she completed a record lift of 148 kg. Folashade Oluwafemiayo Nigeria
Heaviest powerlift (-67.5 kg, female) The heaviest weight lifted in the women's -67.5 kg division is 147 kg and was produced by French powerlifter Souhad Ghazouani in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on 24 February 2012. Souhad Ghazouani France
Heaviest powerlift (-60 kg, female) Powerlifter Souhad Ghazouani (France) lifted 136 kg in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, on 28 July 2010 to break the women's -60 kg world record. Souhad Ghazouani France
Heaviest powerlift (-56 kg, female) Fatma Omar (Egypt) posted a world and Paralympic record lift of 143 kg on her way to winning a gold medal in the women's -56 kg competition at the Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012. Fatma Omar Egypt
Heaviest powerlift (-52 kg, female) Nigeria's Joy Onaolapo won a gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012 when she produced a lift of 131 kg in the women's -52 kg division. Joy Onaolapo Nigeria
Heaviest powerlift (-48 kg, female) The heaviest weight lifted in the women's -48 kg class is 135 kg and was achieved by Esther Oyema (Nigeria) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Esther Oyema Nigeria
Heaviest powerlift (-44 kg, female) Lucy Ejike's (Nigeria) lift of 127.5 kg in the women's -44 kg division has stood since 20 September 2004, when she won gold at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece. Lucy Ejike Nigeria
Heaviest powerlift (-40 kg, female) Powerlifter Nazmiye Muslu (Turkey) produced a lift of 109 kg on her way to winning a gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012. Nazmiye Muslu Turkey
Heaviest powerlift (+100 kg, male) Powerlifter Siamand Rahman (Iran) lifted 291 kg in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, on 4 December 2011 to set a new mark in the men's +100 kg division. Rahman is also the Paralympic +100 kg record-holder, lifting 280 kg at the ExCeL arena in London, UK, on 5 September 2012 to win a gold medal. Siamand Rahman Iran
Heaviest powerlift (-100 kg, male) Mohamed Eldib (Egypt) lifted 249 kg in the men's -100 kg class to win a gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012. Mohamed Eldib Egypt
Heaviest powerlift (-90 kg, male) South Korea's Jong Chul Park had home advantage when he lifted 250 kg in Busan, South Korea, on 30 October 2002 to achieve the heaviest powerlift in the history of the men's -90 kg division. Jong Chul Park Korea (South)
Heaviest powerlift (-82.5 kg, male) Powerlifter Haidong Zhang (China) added the -82.5 kg world record to his existing -75 kg world best (set at the 2000 Paralympic Games) when he lifted 248.5 kg in Kunming, China, on 18 May 2007. Haidong Zhang China
Heaviest powerlift (-75 kg, male) In the men's powerlifting -75 kg division, the heaviest weight lifted is 240 kg and was achieved by China's Haidong Zhang at the Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia, on 26 October 2000. Haidong Zhang China
Heaviest powerlift (-67.5 kg, male) Lei Liu (China) lifted 226 kg at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012 to set a new powerlifting world record in the men's -67.5 kg class. Lei Liu China
Heaviest powerlift (-60 kg, male) Paralympic Games gold medallist Nader Moradi (Iran) lifted 203.5 kg in the men's -60 kg division in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, on 2 December 2011. Nader Moradi Iran
Heaviest powerlift (-56 kg, male) Sherif Othman (Egypt) holds world powerlifting records in both the -52 kg and -56 kg divisions. On 23 February 2012 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, he lifted 206.5 kg in the men's -56 kg competition, beating his Paralympic record of 202.5 kg, set in Beijing, China, on 11 September 2008, in the process. Sherif Othman Egypt
Heaviest powerlift (-52 kg, male) Sherif Othman (Egypt) is the world record-holder in the men's -52 kg division, lifting 191 kg in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on 28 March 2010. Sherif Othman Egypt
Heaviest powerlift (-48 kg, male) Nigeria's Yakubu Adesokan lifted 180 kg in the men's -48 kg powerlifting competition at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012. Yakubu Adesokan Nigeria
Fastest mixed C1-C5 team sprint - track cycling The fastest mixed (male and female) team sprint in the C1-C5 classifications is 49.454 seconds and was set by China as they won gold at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012. The all-male Chinese trio consisted of Xiaofei Ji (C4), Xinyang Liu (C5) and Hao Xie (C2). Cyclists classed as C1, C2, C3, C4 or C5 have an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk but they compete using a standard bicycle. China China
Fastest women's individual C4/C5 time trial (500 metres) - track cycling Two Chinese athletes have the fastest times in the women's 500 metres individual C4/C5 time trial. In the C5 class, Jufang Zhou completed the race in 36.724 seconds in Bordeaux, France, on 20 August 2007. In the C4 class, Jianping Ruan clocked 38.425 seconds to win a bronze medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Cyclists in the C4 and C5 classifications have an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk but they compete using a standard bicycle. Jufang Zhou, Jianping Ruan China
Fastest women's individual C1/2/3 time trial (500 metres) - track cycling Yin He (China, C2) and Jayme Paris (Australia, C1) set new world records in their individual classifications in the final of the women's 500 metres individual time trial at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Gold medallist He clocked 42.448 seconds and bronze medallist Paris finished in 45.449 seconds. The C3-class world record is 43.142 seconds and was set by New Zealander Paula Tesoriero in Manchester, UK, on 8 November 2009. All three classifications are for   athletes with an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk who compete using a standard bicycle. Yin He, Jayme Paris, Paula Tesoriero China
Fastest women's individual B time trial (1 km) - track cycling Felicity Johnson (Australia) clocked 1 min 08.714 sec in the women's 1 km individual B time trial in Los Angeles, USA, on 10 February 2012. The B classification is for athletes with a visual impairment who compete on a tandem with a sighted pilot on the front. Felicity Johnson Australia
Fastest women's individual C5 pursuit - track cycling Sarah Storey (UK), Great Britain's most decorated Paralympian, qualified for the final of the women's individual C5 pursuit in a time of 3 min 32.170 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012. C5 cyclists have an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk but compete using a standard bicycle. Sarah Storey United Kingdom
Fastest women's individual C4 pursuit - track cycling Susan Powell (Australia) clocked 4 min 03.306 sec in the qualification round of the women's individual C4 pursuit at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012. Susan Powell Australia
Fastest women's individual C1/C2/C3 pursuit - track cycling In the qualification round of the women's individual C1/C2/C3 pursuit at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012, Sini Zeng (China, C2) and Jayme Paris (Australia, C1) set new benchmarks for their individual classifications with 4 min 19.841 sec and 4 min 40.123 sec, respectively. The C-3 class world record is currently vacant. Cyclists in these categories have an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk but compete using a standard bicycle. Sini Zeng, Jayme Paris China
Fastest women's individual B pursuit - track cycling Paralympic gold medallist Phillipa Gray (New Zealand) clocked 3 min 31.530 sec in qualification for the final of the women's individual B pursuit at the Velodrome in London, UK, on 2 September 2012. The B class is for athletes with a visual impairment who compete on a tandem with a sighted pilot on the front. Phillipa Gray New Zealand
Fastest men's individual C5 pursuit - track cycling Australia's Michael Gallagher clocked 4 min 30.012 sec in qualification for the men's individual C5 pursuit final at the Velodrome in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Gallagher, who went on to win Paralympic gold in London later that same day, competes in the C5 classification, for athletes with an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk who compete using a standard bicycle. Michael Gallagher Australia
Fastest men's individual C4/C5 time trial (1 km) - track cycling Paralympic gold medallist Alfonso Cabello (Spain) posted 1 min 05.947 sec in the final of the men's 1 km individual C4/C5 time trial at the Velodrome, London, UK, on 31 August 2012 to set a new world record in the C5 classification. Jody Cundy (UK) set the C4 record with a run of 1 min 05.144 sec in Montichiari, Italy, on 12 March 2011. Alfonso Cabello, Jody Cundy Spain
Fastest men's individual C1/2/3 time trial (1 km) - track cycling The C1 and C2 records in the men's individual time trial were set in the final at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012. Zhang Yu Li (China, C1) clocked 1 min 13.009 sec to win gold and Tobias Graf (Germany, C2) posted 1 min 15.858 sec to claim the bronze medal. The C3-class world record - 1 min 08.668 sec - was achieved by Darren Kenny (UK) at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. Athletes in all three 'C' classes have an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk but they compete using a standard bicycle. Zhang Yu Li, Tobias Graf, Darren Kenny China
Fastest men's individual B time trial (1 km) - track cycling Paralympic gold medallist Neil Fachie (UK) clocked 1 min 01.351 sec in the final of the 1 km men's individual B time trial at the Velodrome, London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Athletes in the B classification have a visual impairment and compete on a tandem with a sighted pilot on the front. Neil Fachie United Kingdom
Fastest men's individual C4 pursuit - track cycling Carol-Eduard Novak (Romania) clocked 4 min 40.315 sec in qualification for the men's individual C4 pursuit at the Velodrome in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Cyclists in the C4 classification have an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk but they compete using a standard bicycle. Carol-Eduard Novak Romania
Fastest men's individual C3 pursuit - track cycling Darren Kenny (UK) posted a time of 3 min 35.257 sec to win a bronze medal in the men's individual C3 pursuit at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. C3-class athletes have an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk but they compete using a standard bicycle. Darren Kenny United Kingdom
Fastest men's individual C2 pursuit - track cycling Paralympic gold medallist Guihua Liang (China) clocked 3 min 45.243 sec in the final of the men's individual C2 pursuit at the Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. C2-class athletes have an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk but they compete using a standard bicycle. Guihua Liang China
Fastest men's individual B pursuit - track cycling Kieran Modra (Australia) posted a time of 4 min 17.756 sec to win Paralympic gold in the Velodrome, London, UK, on 30 August 2012. The B classification is for athletes with a visual impairment who compete on a tandem with a sighted pilot on the front. Kieran Modra Australia
Fastest men's individual C1 pursuit - track cycling Paralympic Games gold medallist Mark Lee Colbourne (UK) clocked 3 min 53.881 sec in the final of the men's individual C1 pursuit in the Velodrome, London, UK, on 31 August 2012. Cyclists in the C1 classification have an impairment that affects their legs, arms and/or trunk but they compete using a standard bicycle. Mark Lee Colbourne United Kingdom
Fastest men's individual B sprint - track cycling Anthony Kappes (UK) clocked 10.050 seconds in qualification for the final of the men's individual B sprint at the Velodrome in London, UK, on 2 September 2012. The B class features athletes with a visual impairment who compete on a tandem with a sighted pilot on the front. Anthony Kappes United Kingdom
Most points scored in women's team recurve archery - open There are two world record marks in the women's team recurve (open class) - for 216 and 24 arrows. South Korea scored 1,811 points with 216 arrows in Guangzhou, China, on 13 December 2010. China scored 205 points with 24 arrows at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 15 September 2008. There are three International Federation for Archery classifications (standing, W1 and W2) and athletes from all three classes are eligible to compete in the women's team recurve. South Korea, China Korea (South)
Most points scored in women's individual recurve archery - standing Fangxia Gao (China) scored 641 points in the women's individual recurve (standing position) on home soil in Guangzhou, China, on 13 December 2010. Archers in this Paralympic event are classed as ST (standing), as opposed to athletes in the W1 and W2 classes who compete from a seated position. Fangxia Gao China
Most points scored in women's individual recurve archery - W1/W2 Zahra Nemati (Iran) scored 622 points in the women's individual recurve in Nove Mesto na Morave, Czech Republic, on 30 May 2010. Nemati has since also claimed the Paralympic Games record with 613 points, a feat achieved in the ranking round at the Games in London, UK, on 30 August 2012, on her way to winning the gold medal. Athletes in the W1 and W2 class compete from a seated position and have an impairment that affects their legs and trunk. Additionally, W1 athletes have an impairment that affects their arms. Zahra Nemati Iran
Most points scored in women's individual compound archery - open Danielle Brown (UK) is the dominant force in the women's individual compound (open class). On 11 August 2010, in Vichy, France, she scored 697 points to add a world record to her list of achievements, which include a Paralympic record in 2008 and, most recently, Paralympic gold at London 2012. Danielle Brown United Kingdom
Most points scored in men's team recurve archery - open There are two world record marks in the men's team recurve (open class) - for 216 and 24 arrows. South Korea scored 1,886 points with 216 arrows at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. France scored 220 points with 24 arrows at Nove Mesto na Morave, Czech Republic, on 13 July 2012. There are three International Federation for Archery classifications (standing, W1 and W2) and athletes from all three classes are eligible to compete in the men's team recurve. South Korea, France Korea (South)
Most points scored in men's individual recurve archery - standing Four months before being crowned Paralympic Games champion in London, UK, Russian hotshot Timur Tuchinov scored 659 points in the men's individual recurve (standing position), also in London, on 4 May 2012 to set a new world record in the event. Timur Tuchinov Russia
Most points scored in men's individual recurve archery - W1/W2 Oscar de Pellegrin (Italy) scored 655 points in the men's individual recurve, for athletes in the W1 and W2 classifications, in Alessandria, Italy, on 12 September 2010. W1 and W2 archers compete from a seated position and have an impairment that affects their legs and trunk. Additionally, archers in the W1 class have an impairment that affects their arms. Oscar de Pellegrin Italy
Most points scored in men's individual compound archery - open Philippe Horner (Switzerland) scored 701 points in the men's individual compound (open class) in Vichy, France, on 11 August 2010. Athletes with physical impairments who are eligible for all three classes (ST, W1 and W2) of archery competition can compete in the open class. Philippe Horner Switzerland
Most points scored in men's individual compound archery - W1 Jeff Fabry (USA) scored 678 points in the men's W1 class individual compound in Stoke Mandeville, UK, on 7 September 2009. Athletes in the W1 classification compete from a seated position and have an impairment that affects their arms, legs and trunk. Jeff Fabry United States
Fastest 4 x 100 m relay (T35/T38, female) In a dress rehearsal for the London 2012 Paralympic Games, the Russian quartet of Anastasiya Ovsyannikova, Svetlana Sergeeva, Elena Ivanova and Margarita Goncharova won the women's 4 x 100 metres T35/T38 relay in 54.77 seconds in Stadskanaal, the Netherlands, on 28 June 2012. Russia Russia
Only Paralympian to hold track and field world records in two different classifications As of 9 September 2012, Paralympian Martina Willing (Germany) was the only track and field athlete (male or female) with a disability to hold two current world records in two different classifications. In Bern, Switzerland, on 21 August 1999, Willing launched the javelin 22.71 metres as an F55-class athlete. After being re-classified as an F56 athlete, she achieved 24.03 metres in Berlin, Germany, on 13 June 2008. The F55 and F56 classes are for wheelchair athletes who throw from a seated position. Martina Willing Germany
Farthest club throw (F31/F32/F51, female) The farthest women's club throw in the F32 classification is 23.43 metres and was set by Tunisia's Maroua Ibrahmi on her way to a gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. The F31 record is 10.98 metres, set in the same competition at the same venue on the same date by South Korea's Sunjeong Kim, who was ranked ninth after the distances were adjusted to take into account the level of impairment. The F51 record is 15.83 metres, set by Ireland's Catherine O'Neill in Nove Mesto nad Metuji, Czech Republic, on 18 August 2001. As the name suggests, the club throw involves throwing a wooden club and is the Paralympic equivalent of the hammer throw. Wheelchair-bound competitors throw the club from a seated position, and athletes with cerebral palsy are eligible to compete in the F31 and F32 classifications. Maroua Ibrahmi, Sunjeong Kim, Catherine O'Neill Tunisia
Farthest club throw (F31/F32/F51, male) The farthest men's club throw in the F31/F32 classification is 36.73 metres and was set by Lahouari Bahlaz (Algeria) in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 25 January 2011. Zeljko Dimitrijevic (Serbia) won gold at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012 with a throw of 26.88 metres - the farthest distance thrown in the men's F51 class. As the name suggests, the club throw involves throwing a wooden club and is the Paralympic equivalent of the hammer throw. Wheelchair-bound competitors throw the club from a seated position, and athletes with cerebral palsy are eligible for the F31 and F32 classifications. Lahouari Bahlaz, Zeljko Dimitrijevic Algeria
Farthest javelin throw (F37/F38, female) The farthest javelin throw in the F37/F38 class is 37.86 metres and was set by Shirlene Coelho (Brazil) on her way to a Paralympic Games gold medal in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. Ramune Adomaitiene (Lithuania) set a new mark in the F38 class with a throw of 32.87 metres in Bottrop, Germany, on 13 June 2010. F37-class athlete Coelho and F38 Adomaitiene both have cerebral palsy and use wheelchairs to throw from a seated position. Shirlene Coelho, Ramune Adomaitiene Brazil
Farthest javelin throw (F57/F58, female) Safia Djelal (Algeria) and Mary Nakhumica (Kenya) have recorded the farthest javelin distances in the F58 and F57 classes, respectively, for wheelchair athletes who throw from a seated position. Djelal achieved 31.12 metres in Marrakech, Morocco, on 28 April 2007. Nakhumica threw 23.87 metres at the Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia, on 29 October 2000. Safia Djelal, Mary Nakhumica Algeria
Farthest javelin throw (F46, female) The farthest distance thrown by a woman in the F46 javelin is 41.15 metres and was set by Poland's Katarzyna Piekart at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Gold medallist Piekart competes in a classification for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Katarzyna Piekart Poland
Farthest javelin throw (F54/F55/F56, female) China's Liwan Yang, who competes in the F54 classification, won her second gold medal at the London 2012 Paralympic Games by throwing 17.89 metres in the women's F54/F55/F56 javelin final on 5 September 2012. Germany's Martina Willing is the only track and field athlete (male or female) with a disability to hold two current world records in two different classifications. In Bern, Switzerland, on 21 August 1999, Willing threw 22.71 metres as an F55-class athlete. After being re-classified as an F56 athlete, she achieved 24.03 metres in Berlin, Germany, on 13 June 2008. Liwan Yang, Martina Willing China
Farthest javelin throw (F33/F34/F52/F53, female) Four different classifications make up the women's F33/F34/F52/F53 javelin competition. Birgit Kober (Germany) set a new F34 record with a throw of 27.03 metres to win a gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. F33 competitor Tiina Ala Aho (Finland) threw 14.14 metres in Assen, the Netherlands, on 19 June 2003, F52 javelin thrower Antonia Balek (Croatia) achieved 13.46 metres in Duisberg, Germany, on 3 June 2009, and Esther Rivera (Mexico) recorded a throw of 11.87 metres in the F53 class in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on 13 August 2007. All four classifications are for wheelchair users who throw from a seated position, with the F33 and F34 classes for athletes with cerebral palsy. Birgit Kober, Tiina Ala Aho, Antonia Balek, Esther Germany
Farthest javelin throw (F12/F13, female) Tanja Dragic (Serbia), who competes in the F12 class (for athletes with a visual impairment), won the final of the women's F12/F13 javelin with a throw of 42.51 metres at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012. The F13 record-holder is Guoli Tang (China), who launched a throw of 43.82 metres in Shanghai, China, on 7 May 2000. Tanja Dragic, Guoli Tang Serbia
Farthest javelin throw (F57/F58, male) Mohammad Khalvandi (Iran), with a throw of 50.98 metres, and Claudiney Batista dos Santos (Brazil), with a throw of 45.38 metres, set new benchmarks in the men's F57/F58 javelin at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. Khalvandi competes in the F58 classification and Batista in the F57 classification - both classes are for wheelchair users who throw from a seated position. Mohammad Khalvandi, Claudiney Batista dos Santos Iran
Farthest javelin throw (F52/F53, male) Abdolreza Jokar (Iran) and Peter Martin (New Zealand) have recorded the farthest distances in men's F52/F53 javelin competition. Jokar posted 22.08 metres during the Paralympic Games at Beijing's National Stadium on 12 September 2008, while Martin threw 18.58 metres in Assen, the Netherlands, on 6 September 2006. Both athletes - Jokar in the F53 class and Martin in the F52 category - are wheelchair-bound and throw the javelin from a seated position. Abdolreza Jokar, Peter Martin Iran
Farthest javelin throw (F40, male) Zhiming Wang (China) won three gold medals and claimed three new world records at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK. The amputee won the F40 discus and shot put events at the Olympic Park before completing a hat-trick of titles with a throw of 47.95 metres on 7 September 2012. Zhiming Wang China
Farthest javelin throw (F33/F34, male) New world records were set in both classifications in the final of the Paralympic Games men's F33/F34 javelin competition in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Gold medallist Mohsen Kaedi (Iran) threw 38.30 metres to break the F34 record, and the old F33 record was eclipsed when bronze medallist Kamel Kardjena (Algeria) produced a throw of 26.40 metres. Mohsen Kaedi, Kamel Kardjena Iran
Farthest javelin throw (F12/F13, male) China's Pengkai Zhu won Paralympic gold in the men's F12/F13 javelin with a throw of 64.38 metres in London, UK, on 5 September 2012. Zhu competes in the F12 classification. The F13 record-holder is Seyed Erfan Hosseini Liravi (Iran), who achieved a throw of 61.48 metres in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 29 January 2011. The F12/F13 class is for athletes with a visual impairment. Pengkai Zhu, Seyed Erfan Hosseini Liravi China
Farthest javelin throw (F42, male) In the final of the men's F42 javelin competition at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 7 September 2012, China's Yanlong Fu won the gold medal with a throw of 52.79 metres. The F42 class is for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Yanlong Fu China
Farthest javelin throw (F44, male) Mingjie Gao (China) threw 59.82 metres in the men's F44 javelin in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 23 January 2011. Athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees, compete in the F44 category. Mingjie Gao China
Farthest javelin throw (F54/F55/F56, male) F56 athlete Pieter Gruijters (Netherlands) threw the javelin 42.27 metres at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. Ali Naderi Darbaghshay (Iran), who competes in the F55 classification, achieved 35.30 metres at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece, on 22 September 2004. F54 javelin thrower Alexey Kuznetsov (Russia) managed 29.49 metres in Bottrop, Germany, on 1 June 2011. Athletes competing in the F54, F55 and F56 classes are wheelchair users who throw the javelin from a seated position. Pieter Gruijters, Ali Naderi Darbaghshay, Alexey K Netherlands
Farthest discus throw (F40, female) The F40 class is for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. The farthest distance thrown in F40 competition is 32.37 metres, by Najat El Garraa (Morocco) to win gold at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. Najat El Garraa Morocco
Farthest discus throw (F57/F58, female) Nassima Saifi is an Algerian F58-class discus thrower who achieved a distance of 40.99 metres in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 29 January 2011. Her fellow countrywoman, Nadia Medjmedj, competes in the F57 class and threw 30.59 metres in Tunis, Tunisia, on 17 June 2008. Nassima Saifi, Nadia Medjmedj Algeria
Farthest discus throw (F51/F52/F53, female) Josie Pearson (UK) won Paralympic gold with a throw of 6.58 metres in the women's F51/F52/F53 discus final at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 7 September 2012. Pearson competes in the F51 classification. Martina Kniezkova (Czech Republic), who achieved 15.28 metres at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece, on 20 September 2004, and Cristeen Smith (New Zealand), who threw 14.46 metres in Stoke Mandeville, UK, on 26 July 1995, have posted the farthest distances in the F52 and F53 classifications, respectively. All three women are confined to wheelchairs and throw the discus from a seated position. Josie Pearson, Martina Kniezkova, Cristeen Smith United Kingdom
Farthest discus throw (F35/F36, female) At the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012, two new records were set in the women's F35/F36 discus competition. Mariia Pomazan (Ukraine) bettered the F35 record with a throw of 30.12 metres but had to settle for the silver medal when Qing Wu (China) posted 28.01 metres in the F36 class, which took her to the top of the podium after the distances were re-calculated to take into account the level of disability. Mariia Pomazan, Qing Wu Ukraine
Farthest discus throw (F37, female) Na Mi (China) won the women's F37 discus final at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, with a throw of 35.35 metres on 6 September 2012. Athletes with cerebral palsy compete in the F37 classification. Na Mi China
Farthest discus throw (F11/F12, female) Liudis Maso (Cuba) threw the discus 45.06 metres in Atlanta, USA, on 19 August 1996, competing in the F12 class. The world's best F11 throw is 40.42 metres, achieved by Liangmin Zhang (China) in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 22 January 2011. Athletes in the F11 and F12 categories have a visual impairment. Liudis Maso, Liangmin Zhang Cuba
Farthest discus throw (F54/F55/F56, male) Cuba's Leonardo Diaz (F56, 44.63 metres) and Serbia's Drazenko Mitrovic (F54, 32.97 metres) won gold and silver respectively at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012, setting new world record distances in the men's F54/F55/F56 discus competition. The F55 record-holder is Mustafa Yuseinov (Bulgaria), who achieved 39.42 metres in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 28 January 2011. All three men are wheelchair users who throw the discus from a seated position. Leonardo Diaz, Drazenko Mitrovic, Mustafa Yuseinov Cuba
Farthest discus throw (F51/F52/F53, male) Japan's Toshie Oi (F53, 26.62 metres), Latvia's Aigars Apinis (F52, 21.00 metres) and Algeria's Mohamed Berrahal (F51, 12.37 metres) have achieved the farthest distances in the three classifications that are eligible for this event, which is for wheelchair users who throw from a seated position. Oi set his record in Okayama, Japan, on 30 September 2006, while Apinis and Berrahal re-wrote the record books in the F51/F52/F53 discus final at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 6 September 2012, when Berrahal claimed the gold medal and Apinis silver after the distances were adjusted to take into account the level of impairment. Toshie Oi, Aigars Apinis, Mohamed Berrahal Japan
Farthest discus throw (F42, male) The farthest distance achieved in the F42 discus classification, for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs (including amputees), is 47.85 metres and was set by Fanie Lombaard (South Africa) in Villeneuve-d'Ascq, France, on 24 July 2002. Fanie Lombaard South Africa
Farthest discus throw (F40, male) Zhiming Wang (China) achieved a throw of 45.78 metres to win Paralympic gold in the men's F40 class discus competition at the Olympic Stadium, London, UK, on 4 September 2012. Wang competes in a classification for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Zhiming Wang China
Farthest discus throw (F57/F58, male) Alexey Ashapatov (Russia) won the final of the men's F57/F58 discus event at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, with a throw of 60.72 metres on 31 August 2012. Ashapatov competes in the F58 classification, for field athletes who throw from a seated position. In the similar F57 category, Weihai Zheng (China) is the world record-holder with 49.09 metres, which he achieved at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 13 September 2008. Alexey Ashapatov, Weihai Zheng Russia
Farthest discus throw (F11, male) Visually impaired discus thrower Alfonso Fidalgo (Spain) is the world and Paralympic record-holder in the F11 class. His world best of 44.44 metres, set in Madrid, Spain, has stood since 24 July 1998. At the Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia, on 22 October 2000, Fidalgo registered a throw of 42.19 metres to set a new Paralympic record. Alfonso Fidalgo Spain
Farthest discus throw (F44, male) Jeremy Campbell (USA) threw the discus 63.46 metres in Oklahoma City, USA, on 9 June 2012. He posted a new Paralympic F44 record of 60.05 metres three months later on his way to picking up a gold medal at the Games in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. F44 athletes have an impairment that affects their arms or legs and includes amputees. Jeremy Campbell United States
Farthest discus throw (F37/F38, male) The F37 and F38 class records were both smashed in the final of the men's discus competition at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 7 September 2012. Dong Xia (China), with a throw of 55.81 metres, and Javad Hardani (Iran), with a throw of 52.91 metres, set new F37 and F38 benchmarks, respectively, but it was Hardani who beat Xia to the gold medal after the world record distances were adjusted to take into account each competitor's level of impairment. Athletes with cerebral palsy compete in the F37 and F38 categories. Dong Xia, Javad Hardani China
Farthest discus throw (F35/F36, male) Two Chinese athletes have posted world record distances in the men's F35/F36 discus, and both were set on home soil at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 11 September 2008. F35 athlete Wei Guo achieved a throw of 54.13 metres and his F36 compatriot, Wenbo Wang, posted 38.98 metres. Both compete in classifications for athletes with cerebral palsy. Wei Guo, Wenbo Wang China
Farthest discus throw (F32/F33/F34, male) Wheelchair athletes Yanzhang Wang (China), Hani Alnakhli (Saudi Arabia) and Lahouari Bahlaz (Algeria) won gold, silver and bronze respectively in the men's F32/F33/F34 discus competition at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 7 September 2012, with each man setting a new world record in their respective classifications. Wang (F34) threw 49.03 metres, Alnakhli (F33) 34.65 metres and Bahlaz (F32) 22.30 metres. The F32/F33/F34 classes are for athletes with cerebral palsy who throw the discus from a seated position. Yanzhang Wang, Hani Alnakhli, Lahouari Bahlaz China
Farthest shot put (F57/F58, female) The final of the women's F57/F58 shot put, for wheelchair athletes who throw from a seated position, was won by Angeles Ortiz Hernandez (Mexico) with an F58 throw of 11.43 metres at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. The F57 record-holder is Nadia Medjmedj (Algeria), who produced a throw of 10.93 metres at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. Angeles Ortiz Hernandez, Nadia Medjmedj Mexico
Farthest shot put (F54/F55/F56, female) The F54, F55 and F56 categories are for wheelchair athletes who throw from a seated position. F56 athlete Angela Madsen (USA) threw 9.43 metres in Windsor, Canada, on 14 July 2012. F55 athlete Marianne Buggenhagen (Germany) produced a throw of 9.06 metres at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece, on 19 September 2004, and F54 athlete Liwan Yang (China) threw 7.50 metres to win Paralympic gold in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Angela Madsen, Marianne Buggenhagen, Liwan Yang United States
Farthest shot put (F42/F44, female) Juan Yao (China) registered a throw of 13.05 metres in the final of the Paralympic Games F42/F44 shot put competition in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. Yao competes in the F44 class. Baozhu Zheng (China) had home advantage when she produced a throw of 10.06 metres at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008 to set a new world record in the F42 class. F42 and F44 athletes have an impairment that affects their arms or legs and includes amputees. Juan Yao, Baozhu Zheng China
Farthest shot put (F40, female) The farthest shot put in the women's F40 classification is 9.86 metres and was set by gold medallist Raoua Tlili (Tunisia) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. Athletes in the F40 class have an impairment that affects their arms or legs and includes amputees. Raoua Tlili Tunisia
Farthest shot put (F32/F33/F34, female) Birgit Kober (Germany) set a new F34 world record in the heats of the women's F32/F33/F34 shot put at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, with a throw of 10.25 metres on 6 September 2012. Maria Stamatoula (Greece) registered an F32 throw of 6.61 metres on home soil in Athens, Greece, on 1 June 2012, and F33 athlete Tetyana Yakybchuk (Ukraine) threw 6.50 metres in New London, Connecticut, USA, on 9 July 2005. All three classifications feature wheelchair athletes with cerebral palsy who throw the shot from a seated position. Birgit Kober, Maria Stamatoula, Tetyana Yakybchuk Germany
Farthest shot put (F37, female) The farthest shot put by a woman in the F37 category (for athletes with cerebral palsy) is 12.20 metres, achieved by gold medallist Na Mi (China) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 4 September 2012. Na Mi China
Farthest shot put (F35/F36, female) The final of the women's F35/F36 class shot put at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012 produced two new world records. F35 athlete Mariia Pomazan (Ukraine) threw 12.22 metres and F36 athlete Qing Wu (China) threw 10.64 metres to win gold and bronze medals respectively. The F35 and F36 classifications are for athletes with cerebral palsy. Mariia Pomazan, Qing Wu Ukraine
Farthest shot put (F20, female) Ewa Durska (Poland) set a new world record in the women's shot put (F20) with 14.33 metres in Dreux, France, on 8 July 2006. Durska won the gold medal at the London 2012 Paralympic Games with a throw of 13.80 metres, setting a new Paralympic record. The F20 classification is for athletes with an intellectual impairment. Ewa Durska Poland
Farthest shot put (F11/F12, female) Assunta Legnante (Italy) won a gold medal in the women's F11 shot put at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012 with a throw of 16.74 metres. Tamara Sivakova (Belarus) registered a F12 record throw of 13.06 metres in Assen, the Netherlands, on 6 September 2006. Athletes with a visual impairment compete in the F11 and F12 classifications. Assunta Legnante, Tamara Sivakova Italy
Farthest shot put (F57/F58, male) Alexey Ashapatov (Russia) threw 16.37 metres in the men's F58 shot put event in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 24 January 2011. In the F57 class, Jamil Saleh Elshebli (Jordan) threw 14.28 metres at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. Both men are confined to wheelchairs and throw the shot from a seated position. Alexey Ashapatov, Jamil Saleh Elshebli Russia
Farthest shot put (F54/F55/F56, male) Wheelchair athletes from three different classifications compete in this event. The farthest throw across all three classes belongs to F56 athlete Olokhan Musayev (Azerbaijan), who registered 13.49 metres at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 15 September 2008. F55 athlete Martin Nemec (Czech Republic) threw 11.85 metres in Olomouc, Czech Republic, on 24 June 2006, and F54 athlete Georg Tischler (Austria) threw 10.32 metres in Bangalore, India, on 30 November 2009. Olokhan Musayev, Martin Nemec, Georg Tischler Azerbaijan
Farthest shot put (F52/F53, male) Aigars Apinis (Latvia) and Mauro Maximo de Jesus (Mexico) are the world and Paralympic record-holders in the men's F52/F53 shot put event. Apinis took gold in the F52 final at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, with a throw of 10.23 metres on 31 August 2012, while at the previous Games, Maximo de Jesus threw 8.72 metres in the F53 competition in Beijing, China, on 16 September 2008. Both athletes are wheelchair users who throw the shot from a seated position. Aigars Apinis, Mauro Maximo de Jesus Latvia
Farthest shot put (F46, male) The farthest shot put by a man competing in the F46 class, for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs (including amputees), is 15.68 metres and was set by Russia's Nikita Prokhorov in the Paralympic Games final at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. Nikita Prokhorov Russia
Farthest shot put (F42/F44, male) The farthest shot put in the F44 and F42 classifications were set by Jackie Christiansen (Denmark) and Darko Kralj (Croatia), respectively. Christiansen threw 18.38 metres in the F44 competition in Olomouc, Czech Republic, on 21 August 2011, and Kralj registered a throw of 14.43 metres in the F42 class during the Paralympic Games at Beijing's National Stadium, China, on 10 September 2008. Athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees, compete in the F42 and F44 classes. Jackie Christiansen, Darko Kralj Denmark
Farthest shot put (F40, male) The world record in the men's F40 shot put was set at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, when China's Zhiming Wang registered a throw of 14.46 metres on 6 September 2012. Athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees, compete in the F40 classification. Zhiming Wang China
Farthest shot put (F34, male) Azeddine Nouiri (Morocco) threw 13.10 metres to win the men's F34 shot put at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 4 September 2012. Nouiri competes in the F34 class, for wheelchair athletes with cerebral palsy who throw from a seated position. Azeddine Nouiri Morocco
Farthest shot put (F32/F33, male) Kamel Kardjena and Karim Betina (both Algeria) have recorded the farthest shot put distances in the F33 and F32 classifications, respectively. Kardjena threw 12.24 metres in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 22 January 2011, and in the same event at the same venue on the same day, Betina registered 10.89 metres. Athletes in the F32 and F33 classes have cerebral palsy, and both Kardjena and Betina are wheelchair users who throw the shot from a seated position. Kamel Kardjena, Karim Betina Algeria
Farthest shot put (F37/F38, male) Dong Xia (China) threw an unprecedented 17.52 metres in the F37 class shot put to win a gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012. Ibrahim Ahmed Abdelwareth (Egypt) holds the F38 world and Paralympic records with 15.58 metres and 15.53 metres, respectively, set in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 27 January 2011 and in London, UK, on 5 September 2012, when Abdelwareth claimed a silver medal in the same competition as Xia. Dong Xia, Ibrahim Ahmed Abdelwareth China
Farthest shot put (F20, male) The farthest shot put by a man in the F20 classification, for athletes with an intellectual impairment, is by Todd Hodgetts (Australia), who threw 16.29 metres to win the Paralympic Games final in London, UK, on 7 September 2012. Todd Hodgetts Australia
Farthest shot put (F11/F12, male) Haitao Sun (China) and David Casino (Spain) hold the men's shot put world records in the F12 and F11 classifications (for athletes with visual impairments), respectively, and both records were set in Paralympic competition. Sun threw 16.62 metres in Athens, Greece, on 21 September 2004, and Casino threw 15.26 metres in Sydney, Australia, on 20 October 2000. Haitao Sun, David Casino China
Farthest triple jump (F46, male) The farthest distance achieved in the men's F46 triple jump is 15.20 metres, by Fuliang Liu (China) in the Paralympic Games final held in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. F46 athletes have an impairment that affects their arms or legs and includes amputees. Fuliang Liu China
Farthest triple jump (F12, male) On 8 September 2008 at the National Stadium in Beijing, China, Osamah Masaud Al Shanqiti (Saudi Arabia) jumped 15.37 metres to set a new world and Paralympic record in the men's F12 triple jump, for athletes with a visual impairment. Osamah Masaud Al Shanqiti Saudi Arabia
Farthest triple jump (F11, male) Duan Li (China) completed a triple jump of 13.71 metres at his home Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 12 September 2008. Duan Li China
Farthest long jump (F46, female) The farthest long jump by a woman in the F46 classification (for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees) is 5.89 metres by Australia's Carlee Beattie. She set the record in Melbourne, Australia, on 15 April 2011. Carlee Beattie Australia
Farthest long jump (F42/F44, female) The women's F44 long jump world record is held by Marie-Amelie le Fur (France), who leapt 5.43 metres in Belfort, France, on 22 June 2012. Kelly Cartwright (Australia) won the gold medal in the women's F42 classification at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 2 September 2012 with a jump of 4.38 metres. The F42/F44 classes are for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Marie-Amelie le Fur, Kelly Cartwright France
Farthest long jump (F37/F38, female) The farthest distance jumped in the women's F38 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy, is 4.96 metres and was set by Inna Stryzhak (Ukraine) in Stadskanaal, the Netherlands, on 26 June 2012. Australia's Lisa McIntosh jumped 4.92 metres in Canberra, Australia, on 6 April 2001 to claim the world record in the women's F37 class, which is also for athletes with cerebral palsy. Inna Stryzhak, Lisa McIntosh Ukraine
Farthest long jump (F20, female) The farthest distance jumped by an athlete in the F20 classification is 6.00 metres and was achieved in the Paralympic Games final by Karolina Kucharczyk (Poland) in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. The F20 classification is for athletes with an intellectual impairment. Karolina Kucharczyk Poland
Farthest long jump (F13, female) Marla Runyan (USA), who competed in F13 events for athletes with a visual impairment, jumped 5.88 metres on 1 January 1995. Runyan also holds the Paralympic record in this event, 5.74 metres, set in Atlanta, USA, on 22 August 1996. The American is a five-time Paralympic gold medallist in five different disciplines - 100 metres, 200 metres, 400 metres, long jump and pentathlon. Marla Runyan United States
Farthest long jump (F11/F12, female) Oksana Zubkovska (Ukraine) claimed the gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, with a jump of 6.60 metres on 7 September 2012. Zubkovska competes in the F12 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment. In the F11 class, for athletes who are totally blind, nobody has matched Spaniard Purificacion Ortiz's 5.21 metres, set in Burgos, Spain, on 1 January 1997. Ortiz also holds the Paralympic F11 long jump record, with 5.07 metres, set in Atlanta, USA, on 19 August 1996. Oksana Zubkovska, Purificacion Ortiz Ukraine
Farthest long jump (F46, male) Arnaud Assoumani (France) leapt 7.58 metres in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 22 January 2011 to set a new mark for the men's F46 long jump, which features athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Assoumani also holds the Paralympic long jump record in this classification, with a jump of 7.23 metres at Beijing's National Stadium, China, on 10 September 2008. Arnaud Assoumani France
Farthest long jump (F42/F44, male) Markus Rehm (Germany) broke the F44 world record with a jump of 7.35 metres at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. The F42 world record is held by Wojtek Czyz (Germany), who jumped 6.50 metres at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 16 September 2008. The F42/F44 classifications are for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Markus Rehm, Wojtek Czyz Germany
Farthest long jump (F37/F38, male) Gocha Khugaev (Russia) won a gold medal in the men's long jump in the F37/F38 class (for athletes with cerebral palsy) with a jump of 6.31 metres at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012. Khugaev competes in the F37 classification. In the F38 class, Dyan Buis (South Africa) holds the record for the longest jump with 6.48 metres. Buis has twice achieved this distance, first in Leverkusen, Germany, on 13 July 2012 and then at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012, where he won a bronze medal (competing in the same event as Khugaev) after the results were adjusted to take into account the level of disability. Gocha Khugaev, Dyan Buis Russia
Farthest long jump (F20, male) Jose Antonio Exposito Pineiro (Spain) jumped 7.48 metres in Petrer, Spain, on 22 January 2005. Exposito Pineiro also holds the Paralympic record (7.25 metres), which won him the gold medal at the Games in London, UK, on 4 September 2012. F20 is for athletes with an intellectual impairment. Jose Antonio Exposito Pineiro Spain
Farthest long jump (F36, male) Ukraine's Roman Pavlyk jumped 5.33 metres in Espoo, Finland, on 24 August 2005 to set a new world record for the men's long jump in the F36 class, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Roman Pavlyk Ukraine
Farthest long jump (F13, male) Luis Felipe Gutierrez (Cuba) is the world and Paralympic record-holder in the men's F13 class long jump. The world record stands at 7.66 metres and was achieved in Guadalajara, Mexico, on 18 November 2011. Gutierrez's Paralympic record of 7.54 metres won him the gold medal in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. The F13 classification features athletes with a visual impairment. Luis Felipe Gutierrez Cuba
Farthest long jump (F11, male) Elexis Gillette (USA) set a new world record in the men's long jump (F11) with a leap of 6.73 metres in Mesa, USA, on 7 May 2011. Athletes with a visual impairment compete in the F11 class. Elexis Gillette United States
Highest high jump (F46, male) Maciej Lepiato (Poland) raised the bar for the men's high jump (F46) with a leap of 2.12 metres to win the gold medal at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. The F46 classification is for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Maciej Lepiato Poland
Highest high jump (F42, male) Arnold Boldt's (Canada) record leap of 1.96 metres, at the Paralympic Games in Arnhem, the Netherlands, has stood since 17 June 1980. The F42 classification is for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Arnold Boldt Canada
Fastest wheelchair marathon (T54, female) Wakako Tsuchida (Japan) won the women's marathon in the T54 classification (for wheelchair racers) in 1 hr 38 min 32 sec in Oita, Japan, on 11 November 2001. Wakako Tsuchida Japan
Fastest wheelchair marathon (T54, male) Heinz Frei (Switzerland) won the men's marathon in the T54 classification (for wheelchair racers) in 1 hr 20 min 14 sec in Oita, Japan, on 31 October 1999. Heinz Frei Switzerland
Fastest marathon (T46, male) Mario Santillan Hernandez (Mexico) won the men's marathon in the T46 classification (for athletes with an impairment that affects one arm, including amputees) in 2 hr 27 min 4 sec at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 17 September 2008. Mario Santillan Hernandez Mexico
Fastest marathon (T12, male) Alberto Suarez Laso (Spain) won the men's marathon in the T12 classification (for athletes with a visual impairment) in 2 hr 24 min 50 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 9 September 2012. Alberto Suarez Laso Spain
Fastest 4 x 100 metres relay (T53/T54, male) China (Yang Liu, Chengming Liu, Huzhao Li, Lixin Zhang) won the men's 4 x 100 metres relay (T53/T54) in 3 min 5.46 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. The T53/T54 classifications cover wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. China China
Fastest 4 x 100 metres relay (T42/T43/T44/T45/T46, male) South Africa (Samkelo Radebe, Zivan Smith, Arnu Fourie, Oscar Pistorius) triumphed in the men's 4 x 100 metres relay final (classes T42-T46) in 41.78 seconds at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012. The T42-T46 classifications are for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. South Africa South Africa
Fastest 4 x 100 metres relay (T11/T12/T13, male) Spain hold the world record in the men's 4 x 100 metres relay (T11/T12/T13), stopping the clock at 42.46 seconds in Berlin, Germany, on 28 July 1994. T11, T12 and T13 athletes have a visual impairment. Spain Spain
Fastest wheelchair 5,000 metres (T54, female) Diane Roy (Canada) won the women's 5,000 metres for wheelchair-bound athletes in 11 min 16.96 sec in Arbon, Switzerland, on 26 June 2010. Diane Roy Canada
Fastest wheelchair 5,000 metres (T54, male) As of 9 September 2012, wheelchair athlete Marcel Hug (Switzerland) held three T54 world records in track events, all of which were set in a three-day period in Arbon, Switzerland, in June 2010. In addition to his record-setting victories in the 800 metres and 1,500 metres in Arbon (on 26 and 24 June, respectively), Hug clocked an unprecedented 9 min 53.05 sec in the men's 5,000 metres (T54) on 24 June in front of his home crowd. Marcel Hug Switzerland
Fastest run 5,000 metres (T12, male) El Amin Chentouf (Morocco) won the men's T12 classification 5,000 metres in 13 min 53.76 sec at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. El Amin Chentouf Morocco
Fastest run 5,000 metres (T11, male) Henry Wanyoike (Kenya) set a new world record in the men's 5,000 metres (T11) when he finished in 15 min 11.07 sec at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece, on 24 September 2004. Henry Wanyoike Kenya
Fastest wheelchair 1,500 metres (T54, female) Shelly Woods (UK) clocked 3:21.22 in the women's 1,500 metres (T54) in Arbon, Switzerland, on 24 June 2010. Woods competes in the T54 classification, for wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Shelly Woods United Kingdom
Fastest run 1,500 metres (T20, female) Barbara Niewiedzial (Poland) clocked 4:24.85 in the women's 1,500 metres (T20) in Bollnas, Sweden, on 29 July 2004. The T20 classification is for athletes with an intellectual impairment. Barbara Niewiedzial Poland
Fastest run 1,500 metres (T12, female) At the 2008 Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, Assia El Hannouni (France), who is visually impaired, ran the fastest ever women's 1,500 metres (T12), finishing in 4:19.20 on 14 September. Assia El Hannouni France
Fastest wheelchair 1,500 metres (T54, male) Marcel Hug (Switzerland) is the fastest wheelchair racer in the T54 class 1,500 metres, coming home in 2:54.51 in Arbon, Switzerland, on 24 June 2010. Marcel Hug Switzerland
Fastest run 1,500 metres (T46, male) Abraham Tarbei (Kenya) took Paralympic gold in the men's 1,500 metres final when he finished in 3:50.15 at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 4 September 2012. Abraham Tarbei Kenya
Fastest run 1,500 metres (T20, male) Rafal Korc (Poland) ran the men's 1,500 metres (T20) in 3:54.07 in Tunis, Tunisia, on 6 July 2003. The T20 classification is for athletes with an intellectual impairment. Rafal Korc Poland
Fastest run 1,500 metres (T37, male) Michael McKillop (Ireland) is the fastest man over 1,500 metres in the T37 classification (for athletes with cerebral palsy). On 8 May 2012, he posted a time of 3:59.54 in London, UK. McKillop added the Paralympic record to his list of achievements when he won the final in 4:08.11 at the Games in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. Michael McKillop Ireland
Fastest run 1,500 metres (T11, male) Samwel Mushai Kimani and his sighted guide, James Boit (both Kenya), broke the men's 1,500 metres (T11) record with a run of 3:58.37 at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 3 September 2012. The 2012 Paralympic Games in London were the first to award medals to visually impaired athletes' guides. Samwel Mushai Kimani, James Boit Kenya
Fastest run 1,500 metres (T13, male) Abderrahim Zhiou (Tunisia) ran the men's T13 class 1,500 metres final in 3:48.31 to win gold at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 4 September 2012. Athletes with a visual impairment compete in the T13 classification. Abderrahim Zhiou Tunisia
Fastest wheelchair 800 metres (T54, female) Chantal Petitclerc (Canada) won the women's 800 metres (T54) in 1:45.19 at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 14 September 2008. The T54 classification features wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Chantal Petitclerc Canada
Fastest wheelchair 800 metres (T53, female) Multiple record-holder Jessica Galli (USA) is the fastest women over 800 metres (T53), posting a time of 1:49.82 in Atlanta, USA, on 29 June 2007. Jessica Galli United States
Fastest wheelchair 800 metres (T54, male) On 26 June 2010 in Arbon, Switzerland, Marcel Hug (Switzerland) crossed the line in 1:31.12 to set a new world record in the men's 800 metres (T54). Marcel Hug Switzerland
Fastest wheelchair 800 metres (T53, male) Sukman Hong (South Korea) clocked 1:34.91 in the men's 800 metres (T53) in Arbon, Switzerland, on 24 June 2010. Sukman Hong Korea (South)
Fastest wheelchair 800 metres (T52, male) Tomoya Ito (Japan) clocked 1:52.31 in the men's 800 metres (T52) at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 14 September 2008. Tomoya Ito Japan
Fastest run 800 metres (T46, male) Gunther Matzinger (Austria) won the final of the men's 800 metres (T46) in 1:51.82 at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. Athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees, compete in the T46 classification. Gunther Matzinger Austria
Fastest run 800 metres (T37, male) Ireland's Michael McKillop broke the men's 800 metres (T37) record with a run of 1:57.22 at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. The T37 class features athletes with cerebral palsy. Michael McKillop Ireland
Fastest run 800 metres (T36, male) Evgenii Shvetcov (Russia) ran the men's T36 class 800 metres in 2:05.05 in Stadskanaal, the Netherlands, on 26 June 2012. The T36 classification features athletes with cerebral palsy. Evgenii Shvetcov Russia
Fastest run 800 metres (T13, male) Lazaro Rashid (Cuba) won the men's 800 metres in the T13 classification (for athletes with a visual impairment) in 1:52.50 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on 19 August 2007. Lazaro Rashid Cuba
Fastest run 800 metres (T12, male) Abderrahim Zhiou (Tunisia) won the men's 800 metres (T12) in 1:52.13 at Beijing's National Stadium, China, on 10 September 2008. Zhiou competes in the T12 class, for athletes with a visual impairment. Abderrahim Zhiou Tunisia
Fastest wheelchair 400 metres (T54, female) On 25 September 2004, at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece, Canada's Chantal Petitclerc won the women's 400 metres in a time of 51.91 seconds. The T54 class is open to wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Chantal Petitclerc Canada
Fastest wheelchair 400 metres (T53, female) Jessica Galli (USA) is the record-holder in the women's 400 metres (T53), recording a time of 54.88 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 10 September 2008. The T53 classification is for wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Jessica Galli United States
Fastest run 400 metres (T46, female) Yunidis Castillo (Cuba) completed a hat-trick of Paralympic titles in the T46 classification (for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees) at the Games in London, UK, when she won the 400 metres in 55.72 seconds on 8 September 2012. Castillo also won gold medals in the 100 metres and 200 metres at London 2012, setting a new world record in the latter. Yunidis Castillo Cuba
Fastest run 400 metres (T37, female) Paralympian Lisa McIntosh (Australia) holds world records in the women's 100 metres, 200 metres and 400 metres events, which were all set in front of her home crowd at the Games in Sydney, Australia, in 2000. On 23 October 2000, McIntosh, who has cerebral palsy, ran the 400 metres (T37) in 1:04.79. Lisa McIntosh Australia
Fastest run 400 metres (T13, female) The world record in the women's 400 metres was set by Marla Runyan (USA) in Los Angeles, USA, on 3 January 1995. Her run of 54.46 seconds has not been bettered in the T13 event, which is open to athletes with a visual impairment. Marla Runyan United States
Fastest run 400 metres (T12, female) On 27 September 2004 in Athens, Greece, Assia El Hannouni (France) ran the Paralympic women's 400 metres (T12) in 53.67 seconds. T12 is the classification for athletes with a visual impairment. Assia El Hannouni France
Fastest wheelchair 400 metres (T54, male) In front of his home crowd, China's Lixin Zhang clocked 45.07 seconds in the men's 400 metres (T54) at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 10 September 2008. Zhang competes in a classification for wheelchair users or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Lixin Zhang China
Fastest wheelchair 400 metres (T53, male) Sukman Hong (South Korea) holds the world and Paralympic records over 400 metres (T53). On 26 June 2010, he clocked 47.36 seconds in Arbon, Switzerland, to set a new world record, and on 11 September 2008 in Beijing, China, he broke the Paralympic record with in a finishing time of 47.67 seconds. Hong competes in the T53 classification, for wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Sukman Hong Korea (South)
Fastest wheelchair 400 metres (T52, male) Tomoya Ito (Japan) crossed the line in 57.25 seconds in the men's 400 metres (T52) at Beijing's National Stadium, China, on 12 September 2008. The T52 classification is for wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Tomoya Ito Japan
Fastest run 400 metres (T46, male) The fastest T46 class 400 metres was run by Heath Francis (Australia) in 47.69 seconds in Beijing, China, on 10 September 2008. Heath Francis Australia
Fastest run 400 metres (T44, male) Oscar Pistorius (South Africa) set a new mark for the men's 400 metres (T44) with a time of 45.39 seconds in Daegu, South Korea, on 28 August 2011. The 'Blade Runner' also holds the 400 metres Paralympic record, clocking 46.68 seconds at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 8 September 2012.  The T44 classification is for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Oscar Pistorius South Africa
Fastest run 400 metres (T38, male) Mohamed Farhat Chida (Tunisia) ran the T38 class men's 400 metres in 49.33 seconds in Christchurch, New Zealand, on 29 January 2011. Athletes with cerebral palsy compete in the T38 classification. Mohamed Farhat Chida Tunisia
Fastest run 400 metres (T36, male) Evgenii Shvetcov (Russia) smashed the world record in the men's 400 metres (T36) with a run of 53.31 seconds at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 4 September 2012. Shvetcov competes in the T36 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Evgenii Shvetcov Russia
Fastest run 400 metres (T13, male) Adekunle Adesoji (Nigeria) clocked 47.88 seconds in the men's 400 metres (T13) in Johannesburg, South Africa, on 1 January 1999. Athletes with a visual impairment compete in the T13 class. Adekunle Adesoji Nigeria
Fastest run 400 metres (T12, male) Mahmoud Khaldi (Tunisia) won the men's 400 metres (T12) in 48.52 seconds at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. Khaldi competes in the T12 class, for athletes with a visual impairment. Mahmoud Khaldi Tunisia
Fastest run 400 metres (T11, male) Daniel Silva (Brazil) won the men's 400 metres (T11) in 49.82 seconds in Guadalajara, Mexico, on 18 November 2011. Silva competes in the T11 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment. Daniel Silva Brazil
Fastest wheelchair 200 metres (T52, male) Raymond Martin (USA) clocked 30.18 seconds in the men's 200 metres (T52) at Indianapolis, USA, on 1 July 2012. The T52 classification features wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Raymond Martin United States
Fastest run 200 metres (T12, male) Mateusz Michalski (Poland) won the men's 200 metres final in 21.56 seconds at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. The T12 class is for athletes with a visual impairment. Mateusz Michalski Poland
Fastest run 100 metres (T11, male) Lucas Prado (Brazil) ran the men's T11 class 100 metres in 11.03 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. The T11 classification is for athletes with a visual impairment. Lucas Prado Brazil
Fastest wheelchair 100 metres (T34, male) Walid Ktila (Tunisia) set a new mark for the 100 metres (T34) in Kuwait City, Kuwait, on 17 January 2012, finishing in a time of 15.69 seconds. The T34 classification features athletes with cerebral palsy. Walid Ktila Tunisia
Fastest run 100 metres (T37, male) South African sprinter Fanie van der Merwe narrowly claimed Paralympic gold in the men's 100 metres (T37) in London, UK, on 8 September 2012, setting a new world record. Van der Merwe clocked the same time - 11.51 seconds - as runner-up Yongbin Liang (China) but was declared the winner in a photo finish. The T37 class features athletes with cerebral palsy. Fanie van der Merwe South Africa
Fastest wheelchair 100 metres (T54, female) China's Wenjun Liu set a new world record in the women's 100 metres (T54) final at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 8 September 2012, crossing the line in a time of 15.82 seconds. The T54 class features wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Wenjun Liu China
Fastest run 100 metres (T36, female) Fang Wang (China) clocked 13.82 seconds in the 100 metres at Beijing National Stadium, China, on 16 September 2008. The T36 class is for athletes with cerebral palsy. Fang Wang China
Fastest wheelchair 200 metres (T53, female) The fastest 200 metres in the women's T53 class was recorded by Jessica Galli (USA) at Indianapolis, USA, on 1 July 2012. She completed the race in a time of 28.93 seconds. Galli competes in a class that features wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Jessica Galli United States
Fastest wheelchair 200 metres (T52, female) Michelle Stilwell (Canada) won the women's T52 class 200 metres in 33.58 seconds in Nottwil, Switzerland, on 19 May 2012. Stilwell, who set a new Paralympic record of 33.80 seconds in the same event in London, UK, on 1 September 2012, competes in the T52 classification, for wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Michelle Stilwell Canada
Fastest run 200 metres (T46, female) Cuba's Yunidis Castillo won the women's 200 metres in 24.45 seconds at the Olympic Stadium, London, UK, on 1 September 2012. The T46 classification features athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Yunidis Castillo Cuba
Fastest run 200 metres (T44, female) Dutch athlete Marlou van Rhijn set a new mark for the women's 200 metres when she won gold in a time of 26.18 seconds at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. The T44 class is for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Marlou van Rhijn Netherlands
Fastest run 200 metres (T38, female) Junfei Chen (China) set new world and Paralympic records at the 2012 Games in London, UK, when she ran 27.39 seconds in the 200 metres (T38) final on 6 September 2012. Chen competes in a classification for athletes with cerebral palsy. Junfei Chen China
Fastest run 200 metres (T37, female) Lisa McIntosh (Australia) ran the women's 200 metres (T37) in 28.42 seconds in Sydney, Australia, on 27 October 2000 to complete the sprint double at her home Paralympic Games, setting new world records in both events in the process. McIntosh competes in the T37 classification, which features athletes with cerebral palsy. Lisa McIntosh Australia
Fastest run 200 metres (T36, female) China's Fang Wang clocked 28.60 seconds in the T36 class 200 metres at the Paralympic Games in Athens, Greece, on 26 September 2004. T36 is the classification for athletes with cerebral palsy. Fang Wang China
Fastest run 200 metres (T35, female) Ping Liu (China) crossed the line in 32.27 seconds in Espoo, Finland, on 26 August 2005 to set a new mark in the women's 200 metres. The T35 classification is for athletes with cerebral palsy. Ping Liu China
Fastest wheelchair 200 metres (T34, female) Hannah Cockroft (UK) won the 200 metres (T34) in 31.23 seconds at Indianapolis, USA, on 1 July 2012. Cockroft competes in the T34 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Hannah Cockroft United Kingdom
Fastest run 200 metres (T12, female) Assia El Hannouni and her sighted guide, Gautier Simounet (both France), clocked 24.46 seconds in the 200 metres (T12) final at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. Guides were awarded medals for the first time in Paralympic history at the 2012 Games in London. The T12 class features athletes with a visual impairment. Assia El Hannouni, Gautier Simounet France
Fastest run 200 metres (T11, female) Brazilian Terezinha Guilhermina won the women's T11 class 200 metres in a time of 24.67 seconds in Mexico City, Mexico, on 20 April 2012. Guilhermina, who is completely blind, competes in the T11 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment. Terezinha Guilhermina Brazil
Fastest run 200 metres (T53, male) Christopher Waddell (USA) set a world record for the men's T53 class 200 metres with a time of 25.24 seconds in Atlanta, USA, on 2 July 2004. Christopher Waddell United States
Fastest run 200 metres (T42, male) Richard Whitehead (UK) ran 24.38 seconds in the final of the men's 200 metres (T42) at the Olympic Stadium, London, UK, on 1 September 2012. The T42 classification is for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Richard Whitehead United Kingdom
Fastest run 200 metres (T46, male) Australia's Heath Francis ran 21.74 seconds for the men's 200 metres at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games in China on 9 September 2008. The T46 classification is for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Heath Francis Australia
Fastest run 200 metres (T44, male) Oscar Pistorius (South Africa) clocked 21.30 seconds in the heats of the men's 200 metres at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. The 'Blade Runner' competes in a classification for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Oscar Pistorius South Africa
Fastest run 200 metres (T38, male) Evan O'Hanlon (Australia) ran the men's 200 metres (T38) in 21.82 seconds to win Paralympic gold in London, UK, on 8 September 2012. O'Hanlon, who also set a new Paralympic world record in the 100 metres (T38) at the London Games, competes in a classification for athletes with cerebral palsy. Evan O'Hanlon Australia
Fastest run 200 metres (T37, male) Two athletes share the record for the men's 200 metres in the T37 classification. Fanie van der Merwe (South Africa) clocked 23.10 seconds in Maputo, Mozambique, on 15 September 2011, and Roman Kapranov (Russia) matched his time - setting a new Paralympic record in the process - to win the gold medal in London, UK, on 31 August 2012. Fanie van der Merwe, Roman Kapranov South Africa
Fastest run 200 metres (T35, male) Iurii Tsaruk (Ukraine) broke the world and Paralympic records when he ran the men's 200 metres in 25.86 seconds at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. The T35 classification is for athletes with cerebral palsy. Iurii Tsaruk Ukraine
Fastest wheelchair 200 metres (T34, male) On 4 September 2012, in the final of the men's 200 metres at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, Walid Ktila (Tunisia) set a new world record time of 27.98 seconds. Ktila competes in the T34 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Walid Ktila Tunisia
Fastest run 200 metres (T36, male) Wa Wai So (Hong Kong) clocked 24.65 seconds in the men's 200 metres at Beijing National Stadium, China, on 15 September 2008. So competes in the T36 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Wa Wai So Hong Kong
Fastest run 200 metres (T13, male) The fastest 200 metres in the T13 class is 21.05 seconds and was set by Jason Smyth (Ireland) in the final at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 7 September 2012. Smyth - who also set a world record in the 100 m (T13) at the London Paralympics - competes in the T13 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment. Jason Smyth Ireland
Fastest run 200 metres (T11, male) Lucas Prado (Brazil) ran the men's 200 metres (T11) in 22.48 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 13 September 2008. The T11 classification is for athletes with a visual impairment. Lucas Prado Brazil
Fastest wheelchair 100 metres (T53, female) Lisha Huang (China) crossed the line in 16.22 seconds in the T53 class 100 metres at Beijing National Stadium, China, on 12 September 2008. The T53 classification is for wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Lisha Huang China
Fastest wheelchair 100 metres (T52, female) In Windsor, Canada, on 14 July 2012, Michelle Stilwell (Canada) clocked 18.67 seconds for the 100 metres (T52). The T52 classification is for wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Michelle Stilwell Canada
Fastest run 100 metres (T42, female) Martina Caironi (Italy) set a new world record and claimed Paralympic gold in the women's 100 metres (T42) when she ran the final in 15.87 seconds at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 5 September 2012. Caironi competes in the T42 classification, for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Martina Caironi Italy
Fastest run 100 metres (T46, female) Yunidis Castillo (Cuba) clocked 11.95 seconds in the heats of the women's 100 metres (T46) competition at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 4 September 2012, on her way to winning the Paralympic gold medal. Castillo competes in the T46 classification, for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Yunidis Castillo Cuba
Fastest run 100 metres (T44, female) April Holmes (USA) ran the women's 100 metres (T44) in a time of 12.98 seconds in Atlanta, USA, on 1 July 2006. The Paralympic record for this event is also held by the American, who ran 13.13 seconds in Athens, Greece, on 22 September 2004. Holmes competes in the T144 classification, for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. April Holmes United States
Fastest run 100 metres (T38, female) Inna Stryzhak (Ukraine) broke the world and Paralympic 100 metres (T38) records when she stopped the clock at 13.43 seconds in Beijing, China, on 9 September 2008. Inna Stryzhak Ukraine
Fastest run 100 metres (T37, female) Lisa McIntosh (Australia) ran 13.88 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Sydney, Australia, on 25 October 2000. McIntosh competes in the T37 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Lisa McIntosh Australia
Fastest run 100 metres (T35, female) Ping Liu (China) smashed the 100 metres (T35) world record when she clocked 15.44 seconds in the Paralympic Games final in London, UK, on 7 September 2012. Liu competes in the T35 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Ping Liu China
Fastest wheelchair 100 metres (T34, female) Hannah Cockroft (UK) holds the record for the fastest 100 metres in the T34 class, crossing the line in 17.60 seconds in Nottwil, Switzerland, on 20 May 2012. She also recorded the fastest Paralympic 100 metres (T34) in history when she won the final at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, in 18.06 seconds on 31 August 2012. Cockroft competes in the T34 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Hannah Cockroft United Kingdom
Fastest run 100 metres (T13, female) Omara Durand (Cuba) ran 11.99 seconds in the women's 100 metres (T13) in Guadalajara, Mexico, on 17 November 2011. At the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 6 September 2012, she added the Paralympic record to her list of achievements by clocking 12.00 seconds - just one-hundredth of a second outside her world record time - in the 100 m (T13) final. Durand competes in the T13 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment. Omara Durand Cuba
Fastest run 100 metres (T12, female) Guohua Zhou (China) set a new world record in the 100 metres (T12) with a time of 11.91 seconds at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Zhou competes in the T12 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment. Guohua Zhou China
Fastest run 100 metres (T11, female) Terezinha Guilhermina (Brazil) ran the women's 100 metres (T11) final in 12.01 seconds at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 5 September 2012. Guilhermina competes in the T11 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment. Terezinha Guilhermina Brazil
Fastest wheelchair 100 metres (T54, male) The fastest 100 metres in the men's T54 class was set by Leo Pekka Tahti (Finland) at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. The gold medallist clocked 13.63 seconds in his heat to qualify for the final, which he won in a slower time of 13.79 seconds. Tahti competes in the T54 class, for wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Leo Pekka Tahti Finland
Fastest wheelchair 100 metres (T53, male) Mickey Bushell (UK) holds the world and Paralympic records for the men's 100 metres in the T53 class, which covers wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. On 24 June 2010, in Arbon, Switzerland, he completed the race in 14.47 seconds to set a new world record, and in the Paralympic Games final in London, UK, on 3 September 2012, Bushell took the Paralympic record with a time of 14.75 seconds. Mickey Bushell United Kingdom
Fastest wheelchair 100 metres (T51, male) Toni Piispanen (Finland) holds the world and Paralympic records for the men's 100 metres in the T51 class, which covers wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. On 17 May 2012, in Pratteln, Switzerland, he clocked 21.11 seconds to set a new world record, and in the Paralympic Games final in London, UK, on 3 September 2012, Piispanen lowered the Paralympic record with a time of 21.72 seconds. Toni Piispanen Finland
Fastest run 100 metres (T52, male) Paul Nitz (USA) holds the record for the fastest ever 100 metres in the T52 class. On 20 May 2012, he crossed the line in a time of 16.73 seconds in Nottwil, Switzerland. The T52 classification is for wheelchair racers or field athletes who throw from a seated position. Paul Nitz United States
Fastest run 100 metres (T42, male) Earle Connor (Canada) clocked 12.14 seconds in the men's 100 metres in Leverkusen, Germany, on 1 June 2002. Connor also holds the Paralympic record in the T42 class with a time of 12.32 seconds, set in Beijing, China, on 14 September 2008. Connor competes in the T42 classification, for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Earle Connor Canada
Fastest run 100 metres (T46, male) Adeoye Ajibola (Nigeria) ran the men's 100 metres in 10.72 seconds at the Paralympic Games in Barcelona, Spain, on 6 September 1992. Ajibola competes in the T46 classification, for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Adeoye Ajibola Nigeria
Fastest run 100 metres (T44, male) Jonnie Peacock (UK) ran 10.85 seconds for the men's 100 metres at Indianapolis, USA, on 1 July 2012. Peacock also holds the Paralympic record in the T44 class, clocking 10.90 seconds in the final at the Olympic Stadium in London, UK, on 6 September 2012. Peacock competes in the T44 classification, for athletes with an impairment that affects their arms or legs, including amputees. Jonnie Peacock United Kingdom
Fastest run 100 metres (T38, male) Evan O'Hanlon (Australia) clocked 10.79 seconds in the men's 100 metres at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. O'Hanlon competes in the T38 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Evan O'Hanlon Australia
Fastest run 100 metres (T36, male) Graeme Ballard (UK) ran the men's 100 metres in 11.98 seconds in Manchester, UK, on 22 May 2012. Ballard competes in the T36 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Graeme Ballard United Kingdom
Fastest run 100 metres (T35, male) Sen Yang (China) clocked 12.29 seconds in the men's 100 metres at the Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, on 13 September 2008. Yang competes in the T35 classification, for athletes with cerebral palsy. Sen Yang China
Fastest run 100 metres (T13, male) Jason Smyth (Ireland) ran 10.46 seconds in the men's 100 metres at the Paralympic Games in London, UK, on 1 September 2012. Smyth competes in the T13 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment. Jason Smyth Ireland
Fastest run 100 metres (T12, male) Elchin Muradov (Azerbaijan) clocked 10.66 seconds in the men's 100 metres at Imola, Italy, on 19 June 2010. Muradov competes in the T12 classification, for athletes with a visual impairment. Elchin Muradov Azerbaijan
First disabled athlete to compete at an Olympic Games Gymnast George Eyser (USA, b. Germany, 31 August 1870, d. unknown) competed at the 1904 Olympic Games in St Louis, USA, with a prosthetic wooden left leg. He won six medals in one day - three gold (rope climbing, vault, parallel bars), two silver (pommel horse, combined event - parallel bars, horizontal bar, vault, pommel horse) and one bronze (horizontal bar) to become not only the first athlete with a disability to compete at an Olympic Games but also the first disabled medallist. George Eyser United States
First Olympic and Paralympic medallist Only one athlete has won medals at both the Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. Fencer Pál Szekeres (Hungary) won a bronze medal in the men’s team foil at the Olympic Games in Seoul, South Korea, in 1988 and, after being injured in a bus accident in 1991, he took up wheelchair fencing and won gold medals in the individual foil in Barcelona, Spain, in 1992 and in the individual foil and individual sabre in Atlanta, USA, in 1996. Szekeres also won three bronze medals as a Paralympian, in the individual foil at Sydney 2000 and Beijing 2008 and in the individual sabre at Athens 2004. Pál Szekeres Hungary
First flag-bearer at a Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games Swimmer Natalie du Toit (South Africa) was the flag-bearer at the opening ceremonies of both the Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Beijing, China, in 2008. The 11-time Paralympic gold medallist is one of only nine athletes to have competed at both the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Natalie du Toit South Africa
First Paralympic Games to award medals to visually impaired athletes’ guides For the first time in Paralympic Games history, medals were awarded to the sighted guides of all visually impaired athletes at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK. Previously, only the visually impaired competitor was awarded a medal, but ahead of the 2012 Games the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) ruled that a visually impaired athlete and their guide should be considered a team, with both in contention for the medals. London Paralympic Games 2012 United Kingdom
Most countries represented at a Summer Paralympic Games A record 166 National Paralympic Committees (NPCs) sent athletes to the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK. Fifteen countries - including eight from Africa - competed at a Summer Paralympic Games for the first time: Antigua & Barbuda, Brunei, Cameroon, Comoros, Djibouti, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, North Korea, San Marino, the Solomon Islands and the US Virgin Islands. London Paralympic Games 2012 United Kingdom
Most female athletes at a Paralympic Games An unprecedented 1,513 female athletes competed in 19 different sports at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK. A record 4,200 Paralympians from 166 countries took part in the 2012 Games. London Paralympic Games 2012 United Kingdom
Most participants at a Summer Paralympic Games A record 4,200 athletes from 166 countries took part in the London 2012 Paralympic Games, competing in 503 medal events in 20 different sports. London Paralympic Games 2012 United Kingdom
Largest global TV audience for a Paralympic Games An estimated four billion people around the world had access to TV broadcasts of the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK, eclipsing the cumulative global TV audience of 3.8 billion for the 2008 Games in Beijing, China. The 2012 Paralympic Games was screened in an unprecedented number of countries - more than 100, including the USA, Canada, South Africa, Australia and Japan - and generated more than £10 million ($15.7 million) in global broadcasting rights - another record for a Paralympic Games. London Paralympic Games 2012 United Kingdom
Most tickets sold for a Paralympic Games A record 2.7 million tickets were sold for the 2012 Paralympic Games in London, UK, making it the first sell-out in the 52-year history of the event. The original allocation of 2.5 million tickets sold out during the Games, with another 100,000 tickets made available from contingency as seating plans were fine-tuned, and a further 100,000 non-event tickets were released to allow people access to the Olympic Park. London Paralympic Games 2012 United Kingdom