4. THE LANDING
Felix released his parachute at around 1,525 m (5,000 ft)
above ground level and touched down just 72 km (45 miles)
from his place of lift-off. Among those waiting to welcome
him was Red Bull Stratos’s Technical Project Director, Art
Thompson (
below right
).
3. The leap
Soon after jumping, Felix went into a spin. He could have
deployed a stabilizing parachute there and then – but due to
his extensive training he was able to regain control without
it. His descent was so rapid that he broke the sound barrier,
65 years to the day after Chuck Yeager (USA) became the
first man to do so. But Chuck had achieved his feat – the
first
supersonic flight
– in a Bell XS-1 rocket aircraft!
069
SEA LEVEL
10,000 FT
20,000 FT
30,000 FT
40,000 FT
130,000 FT
60,000 FT
50,000 FT
70,000 FT
80,000 FT
100,000 FT
120,000 FT
90,000 FT
110,000 FT
33,333 ft
Vesna Vulović
(Yugoslavia)
survived a fall
from 10,160 m
(33,333 ft) on
26 January
1972 after
the DC-9 she
was working
aboard blew
up – the
highest fall
survived
without a
parachute
.
102,800 ft
(31,333 m)
The previous
record for the
highest jump,
achieved in
1960 by US
Air Force
Captain Joe W
Kittinger.
SUPERSONIC
man
Felix broke the sound
barrier 34 sec into his freefall
and continued accelerating
to 1,357.6 km/h
(843.6 mi/h;
Mach 1.25)!
15
Number of
cameras on the
capsule, nine of
which were HD.
4 min
20 sec
Length of time
Felix spent in
freefall.
127,852 ft
(38,969.4 m)
Felix’s jump
altitude.
113,740 ft
(34,668 m)
Official altitude
record to beat,
set by Malcolm
Ross and Victor
Prather (both
USA) on 4 May
1961.
109,730 ft
(33,445 m)
Felix reaches
the speed of
sound.
123,800 ft
(37,734 m)
Unofficial
manned balloon
altitude record
to beat, set
by Nicholas
Piantanida
(USA) on
2 February
1966.
Pioneers
1,2,3,4,5,6 8,9,10,11,12,13,14