The LEGO Movie hits theaters this weekend and if you haven't seen the adorable trailer for it yet, well, you're welcome.

While this marks the full-length feature debut of our favorite little plastic brick characters, people have used LEGO pieces to break world records for years. Here then to get you pumped for the adventures of Emmet, Batman, and Abraham Lincoln are 10 of the best Guinness World Records titles broken with LEGOs.

Want to zip through just the photos? They're all together in the gallery above.

MOST CONTRIBUTORS TO AN INTERLOCKING PLASTIC BRICK SCULPTURE

Exactly 18,556 people were organized by Cartoon Network across nine locations in the UK, from August 4 to October 4, 2012. They built the character Bloxx (image No. 1 above) from Cartoon Network's Ben 10: Omniverse. In the end, this 240,000-brick piece weighed almost a tonne and stood 3 m (9 ft 10 in) high.

TALLEST STRUCTURE BUILT WITH INTERLOCKING PLASTIC BRICKS

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One of our most popular records of any kind, this tower measures 34.43 m (112 ft 11.75 in) and was constructed by the Red Clay Consolidated School District (USA) in Wilmington, Delaware, USA, on Aug. 19, 2013. Read more about this attempt here.

LARGEST DISPLAY OF LEGO® STAR WARS™ CLONE TROOPERS

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All at attention to Lord Vader, this display was composed of 35,210 individual models and was built by LEGO® in Slough, UK, on June 27, 2008. One of two Star Wars records here; The Force is strong!

LARGEST IMAGE BUILT FROM INTERLOCKING PLASTIC BRICKS

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This single image built entirely of LEGOs measures 153 m² (1,646 ft² 126 in²) and was created by LEGO GmbH (Germany) in collaboration with Manor AG and Pro Juventute (both Switzerland) at the Suisse Toy, in Bern, Switzerland, on Oct. 6, 2012. More than 2 million bricks were used to create a map of all Switzerland.

LARGEST LIFE-SIZED HOUSE MADE FROM INTERLOCKING PLASTIC BRICKS

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This house stands 4.69 metres (15 ft 4 in) high, 9.39 metres (30 ft 9 in) long and 5.75 metres (18 ft 10 in) wide, consisting of two floors with four rooms in total. It was completed by 1,200 volunteers together with James May (UK) for James May's Toy Stories in Dorking, UK, on Sept. 17, 2009. Built around an internal wooden support structure, the house used more than 2.4 million bricks.

LARGEST COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE LEGO® TECHNIC SET

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Check out that 1:12.5-scale Mercedes-Benz Unimog U 400 truck, which comprises 2,048 pieces. Once completed, the truck features a pneumatically powered, articulated crane with working grabber and a recovery winch on the front, has working steering, 4-wheel drive and suspension, a gear block for ground clearance and a detailed engine with moving pistons. It's nicer than my car.

LARGEST COMPLETE SKELETON MADE FROM LEGO® BRICKS

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If there's ever a LEGO® Jurassic Park movie, this guy will star. This T-rex stands 6 m (20 ft) in length and comprised 80,020 pieces, representing an actual-size skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus rex by Nathan Sawaya (USA) for a 2011 exhibition.

LARGEST COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE LEGO® SET

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This record (based on the number of individual pieces) belongs to the 5,922-piece Taj Mahal (No. 10189). When completed, the model of the famous Indian temple measures 51 x 41 cm (20 x 16 in).

LARGEST PRIVATE COLLECTION OF COMPLETE LEGO® SETS

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Want to play with LEGOs? Find Kyle Ugone (USA). His private collection of complete sets totaled 1,091 in Yuma, Arizona, USA, as of 23 July 2011. A Marine, Ugone started his collection in 1986. This photo represents just a small portion of all his completed sets.

LARGEST COLLECTION OF STAR WARS INTERLOCKING PLASTIC BRICK SETS

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We told you; the Force is here, between you, me, the tree, the rock, everywhere, yes. Star Wars LEGOs have proven wildly popular, to the point that the largest collection of Star Wars interlocking plastic brick sets consists of 272 sets, as of Sept. 18, 2012, and belongs to Jon Jessesen (Norway) in Vika, Norway. The sets total 119,368 individual pieces.