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Royal baby still nameless, Dennis Farina dies, Aston Martin celebrates 100 years - News in World Records

 
 
 
 
 
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In sad news, American actor Dennis Farina died Monday. Known for his many Hollywood roles as a man of the law, Farina (pictured above) actually spent 20 years as a real-life police detective before "playing one on TV." He was most famous, perhaps, for his recurring role on the iconic show "Law & Order," in which he appeared for a total of 46 episodes as Detective Jerry Fontana. The series and its various spin-offs hold the record for most successful current cop show franchise, with more than 1,000 episodes produced and counting.

Looking for new Royal Baby news? Sorry folks! Besides looking for some extra search engine results, we have nothing new to add about the little prince. Now that we know the child is born and that he's appeared under a pile of blankets, we all wait for a name (personally, I think George is pretty good value at 5/1!). But in the meantime, check out this cool look at how the rest of the world took the news, and don't forget to check out our record-breaking take on yesterday's historic birth.

Iconic car brand Aston Martin celebrates its 100th anniversary this year and the luxury automaker decided to give its fans an up-close-and-personal take this week. More than 550 Aston Martin cars were parked in Kensington Gardens for fans to see Monday, totalling a worth of over £1 billion ($1.53 billion) and a century-long legacy. This would seem a perfect chance to attempt the record for the largest parade of Aston Martin cars but, that record is exactly as it sounds - a parade. This means the cars are required to run a route, whereas yesterday's lot all stayed parked. The number to beat for such a parade record is 200 vehicles.

Lastly, an uplifting story on teamwork and bravery from Japan. After a woman found herself caught between train and track in a metro station in Saitama, near Tokyo, commuters and staff joined together to lift the 32-ton train enough for the pinned woman to escape unharmed. Around here it reminds us of the team of 100, led by Switzerland's Michael Bühler, that pulled a 646,350 kg (1,424,958 lbs) train in 2009 for the heaviest vehicle pulled over 100 m by a team. Teamwork makes the dream work people!

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