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Tigers Threatened by Dog Disease, New Consoles at E3, and the £2,000,000 Motorhome. It's the News in World Records!

 
 
 
 
 
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Endangered tiger species are under threat from a virus normally found in pet dogs, a wildlife expert has warned.

Canine distemper virus, similar to measles in humans, has evolved over recent years, and can now infect big cats and even marine mammals such as seals.

Sumatran tigers, native to Indonesia, are the smallest tiger subspecies, averaging just 2.4m (7ft 10in) from nose to tail length for males, compared to an average of 3.15 m (10 ft 4 in) for Siberian tigers.

With under 500 Sumatran tigers left in the wild, Indonesian vets must work hard to protect this rare species from the virus.

Tomorrow sees the start of the E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo) show, a highlight in the video gaming calendar. 

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The show will feature early glances at the next generation of video games consoles, including Microsoft's Xbox One, and Sony's Playstation 4, both set to launch by the end of this year.

However, the console manufacturers may be on the back foot, as a large number of gamers are now playing on mobile devices instead of the home consoles - the iPhone 4 was the fastest-selling portable gaming system with 1.5 million units sold within 24 hours of launch, and the most downloaded mobile games series, Angry Birds, has seen more than 1 billion downlaods to iOS and Android devices.

A £2,000,000 motorhome that may be the most expensive of its kind in the world has gone on sale in Dubai, the Daily Mail reports.

The "eleMMent Palazzo" features an on-board bar, huge bedroom, a fireplace, and even a rooftop terrace, complete with underfloor heating - and is available in white or gold.

However, the 40ft vehicle, while luxurious, is handily beaten in weight terms by the heaviest limousine - the 22,933kg (50,560lb) Midnight Rider - whose interior also includes a bar!

Finally, ever thought of trying your luck with a metal detector?

Well, Wesley Carrington certainly did, and was richly rewarded - finding a cache of Roman gold coins worth around £100,000, within minutes of using the treasure-seeking device.

The 159 coins, soon to be appraised by the British Museum, is not the largest hoard of coins ever discovered, though. The Brussels hoard of 1908 consisted of around 150,000 coins, including some minted by English monarsh Henry III.

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